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Giving Voice to the Voiceless: Carrie Wood Shares why she is a Public Defender


Carrie Wood

Formerly an Assistant Academic Director at the Ohio Innocence Project (OIP) here with UC College of Law, Carrie Wood ’95 now works with the Ohio Public Defender in Columbus, Ohio.

Originally from Cincinnati, Wood studied engineering at Cornell University.  Before coming to UC for her legal studies, she spent three years as a professional equestrian, training horses, teaching students, and helping to run a 60 horse farm.  She had an interest in law school, however, and decided to return to Cincinnati to pursue her JD. Before starting school, though, she worked at Graydon Head for a year, giving her a birds-eye view of the profession she was about to enter.

Wood worked on several of the primary wrongful conviction cases in her three years at OIP.  Some of the issues involved were mistaken eyewitness identification, “un-validated” or improper forensic science, and informants.  “Although post-conviction DNA testing played a role in all of these cases, the causes of wrongful conviction do not go away if the case does not have evidence where DNA testing can help shed light on the identity of the perpetrator,” she explained while noting that the demonstration of innocence without DNA can be more difficult.  She said that the law students involved at OIP often work even harder in such cases, sharing that “it was a great experience for [her] as their supervisor to see the energy, drive, passion, and compassion the law students bring to their work on these cases.”

Now working with the Ohio Public Defender, Wood is returning to the type work she did before joining the OIP.  (She has prior experience as a public defender from her time working in the Bronx doing trial work.)  She learned a lot from OIP regarding DNA, false confessions, “junk science,” and some of the major flaws in the criminal justice system.  “It has always been important to me to work to correct flaws in our criminal justice system,” explained Wood, “and I saw the position at the Ohio Public Defender as an opportunity to continue and expand upon that work.”

“In order to work as a public defender, you have to have a passion for it,” she reflected, noting that the money is not much of an incentive.  She explained that, the way she sees it, criminal defense attorneys and public defenders are not quite one in the same.  “Some people do both – and do them well.  However, my primary purpose in going to law school was to work on behalf of people who didn’t have a voice or access to legal counsel.”  And this is what Carrie is able to do as a public defender.  “It can be difficult and draining work, but it was always helpful for me to have supporters and mentors to turn to when I had a difficult case or a difficult week in court.” 

In her spare time, Wood still rides horses, and also hopes to run a marathon this year.  Further, she has always had a passion for music, and admits she will miss the local music scene.  “Cincinnati’s larger music festivals are doing a great job of putting the city on the national music map; I will definitely be back in September to see the Afghan Whigs at Mid-point!”