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Law Students Take Part in University Project Slam


On a recent Saturday in April, four local companies brought together one start-up enterprise and students from six area universities to take part in what may be the area’s first “university project slam.”

What is a university project slam? It’s an opportunity for a local small business to get real world advice from future business, creative, and legal minds, working under the direction and guidance of area professionals. 

Teams of students, including UC Law’s Michelle James ’13 and Christian Dennery ’13, were selected to take part in this event.

“Though no legal advice was required, I wanted to revive and reinvigorate my business skills,” said law student Michelle James about why she took part in this venture. “I also have a soft spot for small businesses and it was great to know I was helping out a growing Cincinnati enterprise.”

The local start-up—handpicked by cohost companies: The Brandery Group, CincyTech, bioLOGIC Corp and Centrifuse—faced a critical business challenge.  They had created a phone application specifically geared toward music. Banking on the success of the launch, the start-up team was contemplating whether to remain in the industry or use the knowledge and skills to expand into other areas. If expansion was the solution, how should it be done?   

The teams, comprised of students from a combination of backgrounds, including MBA, computer information systems, marketing, graphic design, and entrepreneurship, then worked together to figure out the best solution and make recommendations for the company.

James’s team bet on expanding the operation. Dennery’s team recommended the company use the technology to provide exclusive content, building a “buzz” about the program.

About the experience James said, “I wanted to see what practical problems businesses are actually facing on a daily basis. It was a great opportunity to network with other students from other disciplines and schools as well.”

Dennery concurred, “It was a great opportunity to get out of the law school bubble and meet other professionals. And, it was a lot of fun.”

James, who graduates this year, would like to practice in the areas of commercial, corporate, mergers and acquisition, real estate or tax law.  Dennery, who also graduates this year, will focus on small practice bankruptcy and small business reorganization and restructuring. He plans to open his own practice.

Teams consisted of students from Miami University, Xavier University, the College of Mt. Saint Joseph, Cincinnati State, Northern Kentucky University, and UC—Law, DAAP, and Business programs.  Professor Lew Goldfarb, Director of UC Law’s Entrepreneurship and Community Development Clinic, was on-hand as an advisor/mentor throughout the day, along with other “advisors/mentors” from various active investment groups, service providers, and local entrepreneurs.

Joshua Smith '14 Gets a Bird’s Eye View of UC as a Board of Trustees Member


Joshua Smith arrived at Ohio University in the fall of 2006 intending to pursue a degree in education.  Smith switched to political science/pre-law as a sophomore, however, realizing he wanted to attend law school down the road.

“I always liked the idea of representing someone and the court system always amazes me, along with the entire legal system,” said Smith, a native of Westerville, a northeast Columbus suburb.

He didn’t graduate until 2011, but it was not because he needed a fifth year of classes to graduate.  Rather, he spent a year deployed in Bagram, Afghanistan as a United States Army Military Police Officer.

Smith spent the spring of 2008 and that summer following his sophomore year in basic training, as part of becoming a soldier in the U.S. Army Reserves 447th MP CO. He returned to the Athens, Ohio, campus for his junior year, but spent July 2009 through July 2010 in Afghanistan.

“It really was a great experience,” Smith said. “It’s kind of an adventure in a way. You’re going to a country you know nothing about.”

Smith said his year in Afghanistan went by “really fast,” and he made some of his best friends there. During the first half of the deployment, he did basic security operations, manning guard towers and doing patrols around the base. The second half involved detainee operations, doing a lot of prison work.

After returning from Afghanistan, Smith returned to OU for his final year of school, where he became president of his fraternity, Phi Kappa Tau. He received a national award for “Outstanding President” for that 2010-11 year.

Joining the UC Law Family

The 2011 OU graduate was attracted to the College of Law for a number of reasons as a prospective student, including the small class sizes. Since enrolling at the College of Law, the current 2L has been impressed by the faculty.

“I’m working with Professor (Sandra) Sperino right now on an individual research project. I took her Employment Law class and Civil Procedure II and enjoyed her as a professor,” Smith said. “I’m also in Professor (Felix) Chang’s Agency class, and also enjoy him as a professor.”

Smith is a member of Moot Court and will be one of two directors of its intramural competition next fall. He also participated in Student Court as a 1L, where he and some of his peers represented UC students in disputing parking tickets. It was through this activity that Smith made an interesting connection, one that led him to a position that no other student on the entire campus holds: graduate student trustee on the University of Cincinnati Board of Trustees.

“I actually represented the Graduate Student Governance Association’s president in Student Court,” Smith said. “She liked me enough that she thought I would do a good job at that position and told me to apply for it.”

Being a Member of UC’s Board of Trustees is a Big Responsibility

After submitting his resume last April and participating in a phone interview of sorts during the summer, Smith was offered the position for a two-year term.  “It was kind of a shock to me,” said Smith, who is joined by an undergraduate student as the non-voting members of the Board.

Smith attends public Board of Trustees meetings every two months. While not a voting member, he is still asked for input and gives a report every two months on the entire graduate body – the College of Law, the College of Medicine and the other graduate programs. He also serves on subcommittees as well, including the Academic and Student Affairs Committee, as well as the Finance and Administration Committee.

In this first term, which dates back to August, Smith was involved with a number of issues and happenings, including the appointment of President Santa J. Ono in October.

Outside of school, Smith is a law clerk at the Law Office of Marc Mezibov. He also spent last summer as a judicial extern for Judge Sandra S. Beckwith in the United States District Court for the Southern District of Ohio.

Smith is an avid sports fan and he made his first Great American Ball Park appearance of the season on April 5, when the Cincinnati Reds beat the Washington Nationals 15-0.  The Westerville North High School graduate will be living in Columbus this summer and hopes to play in some pick-up rugby games with his former high school teammates.

By Jordan Cohen, ‘13

Sapphire Diamant-Rink ’11


Sapphire Diamant-Rink ’11As a Morgan Fellow I furthered my education with unique and invaluable experiences. Growing up on the Blackfeet Reservation, I have always had a passion for the rights of Native Americans and indigenous peoples everywhere. This, as well as a fascination with comparative law, led me to the Urban Morgan Institute at UC. My time as a clerk at the High Court of Botswana working with their parallel traditional tribal legal system, as well as my fellowship at the Indian Law Resource Center in my home state of Montana, allowed me to narrow my focus and gave depth to my understanding of the human rights issues involved. I was one of the four applicants chosen for the Honors Program at the Office of the Solicitor in the U.S. Department of the Interior. Following completion of that program, I am now an Attorney-Advisor in the U.S. Department of the Interior for the Division of Indian Affairs in Washington, D.C., where I focus on Indian water rights, tribal government, trust responsibility and a variety of other Indian law matters.

3L Casey Kirchberg Shares His ECDC Experience in CBA Report


Third year law student Casey Kirchberg had the opportunity to share his experience as a fellow with the Entrepreneurship and Community Development Clinic (ECDC) with local bar association members. His story about what he has learned is featured in the April 2013 issue of the CBA Report.  Read the story here.

University of Cincinnati College of Law Wins National Moot Court Competition


The University of Cincinnati College of Law Moot Court team of Sarah Kyriakedes and Tony Strike brought home a first place win at the 15th Annual Herbert J. Wechsler National Criminal Law Moot Court Competition.  The team won the overall competition and Strike won the Final Round Best Advocate Award. The event was held Saturday, March 23, 2013, hosted by the SUNY Buffalo Law School.

Kyriakedes and Strike, who will both graduate this year, have been on the Moot Court Board since their second year of law school after making the team during the Intramural Competition.  (There, Kyriakedes won the Best Overall Score during the competition.) They became partners last year for their first competition: the Benjamin N. Cardoza School of Law Moot Court Competition.  (Strike won Best Overall Oralist at this competition.)  In addition, they worked together on the Trial Practice Team for the last two years.

“I got involved in Moot Court, because I wanted to improve my oral advocacy skills,” said Kyriakedes. “After graduation, I always knew that I wanted to be in the court room actively litigating. I knew that Moot Court would give me an opportunity to practice my courtroom etiquette and to grow from the constructive criticism that I received.” 

Strike concurred. “I came to law school in large part because I want to do things in the courtroom and Moot Court is one of the best ways to get that sort of experience. Moot Court is an excellent way to delve into a particular topic and get a sense of the way the law develops.” 

Prepping for the Moot Court Competition

The Herbert J. Wechsler National Criminal Law Moot Court Competition is one of the leading national moot court competitions in the United States to focus on topics in substantive criminal law. Problems address the constitutionality and interpretation of federal and state criminal statutes as well as general issues in the doctrine of federal and state criminal law.

The Wechsler Competition consisted of two parts: a written brief and oral arguments.  After receiving the material for the brief in January, Kyriakedes and Strike researched and reviewed the issues, dividing responsibilities between the two. Before they began writing their brief, they met with Professor Janet Moore and Professor Christo Lassiter to brainstorm ideas about how to approach the problem. They estimate it took about three weeks to write the 30 page brief. (Meanwhile, they were also practicing for a Trial Practice Competition in February!)

After turning in the brief, they began to prepare for the oral arguments, including weekly meetings to talk through issues and problem spot and weeks of practice “moot sessions.” During these sessions, they basically ran through their arguments as if they were in the actual competition with different people acting as judges to ask questions.  Because the Moot Court Program is a student organization, there aren’t formal coaches. So, the students reached out to professors and attorneys in the community to help them prepare.

“We knew that the best way to get prepared was to soak up all the advice that we could get,” said Kyriakedes.  Judge Patrick Fischer, Hamilton County Court of Appeals, First Appellate District of Ohio; Professor Moore; Donald Caster, an attorney with UC Law’s Ohio Innocence Project; and fellow student Sundeep Mutgi, the Moot Court Executive Director, helped with practice and acted as judges.

Looking Ahead to Life after Moot Court and Law School

Both Kyriakedes and Strike are already making plans for life after law school. Strike has been working part-time at the Hamilton County Prosecutor’s Office and hopes to continue that full-time after passing the bar. This "new" career of Strike's comes on the heels of a lengthy career in business, including receiving an MBA from Harvard.

Kyriakedes will be moving to Charlotte, North Carolina after graduation. She hopes to work at the Mecklenburg County District Attorney’s Office, where she interned this past summer. “It has always been my goal to pursue a career as a public servant, so that I could use my legal education and skills to better the public welfare as a prosecutor.”

Take Note: Recent Moot Court Competition Success

Amy Bedinghaus’14 and Erica Helmle’14: advanced to the quarterfinal round at the Whittier Moot Court Juvenile Law Competition.

Nina Vachhani’13 and Josh Langdon’13: advanced to the octo-final round of the 2013 Cardozo/BMI  Entertainment and Communications Law Competition. Team also had top 10 brief.

Cincinnati Named a top 10 Revitalized City for Young Professionals by Forbes


Forbes magazine has included Cincinnati, OH on its list of the top 10 revitalized cities for young professionals. According to the article “Downtowns: What’s Behind America’s Most Surprising Real Estate Boom” by Morgan Brennan, America’s major metro area downtowns experienced double-digit population growth in the decade ending 2010, more than double the rate of growth for their overall cities. As more Americans, particularly college-educated young adults ages 25 to 34, opt for urban lifestyles, cities are working to revitalize their central business districts. Cincinnati, OH is listed as one of them.

See what they’re saying about downtown Cincinnati’s transformation: Forbes magazine article

Law Review Launches New Blog as Additional Outlet for Legal Discourse


Legal scholarship has taken to the blogs.  To position the College of Law’s Law Review for the future, they have joined the movement, launching the UC Law Review Blog,

The goal of the UC Law Review Blog is to further legal scholarship through shorter, quicker, discussion-based discourse by contributors with practical experience, and to allow more student contributors to build domain expertise and be published in their profession.  The Blog is designed to target practitioners and provides an outlet for legal discourse that is often not covered in traditional Law Review articles.

New blog submissions from professors, students (even if not on Law Review), and practitioners are being accepted.  Additionally, Professor Sean Mangan will serve as a Contributing Editor.

All are invited to follow the UC Law Review Blog online and take part in the legal blogging movement!

JD-MBA Student William Volck Focuses on Career as In-House Counsel


William Volck ’14 has contemplated a number of legal career paths in the last two years. At first he considered sports law and becoming a sports agent. He flirted with the idea of litigation, aided in part by his summer work experience with a local judge. Now he is geared toward an eventual career in house. Regardless of where he ends up and what type of law he ultimately practices, Volck has not strayed from his initial goal as a college freshman of going to law school and working towards a JD.

Volck was born on a Navajo reservation in Northern Arizona but moved to his father’s hometown of Cincinnati at age five. After attending St. Xavier High School, Volck headed to Indiana University. He knew when he arrived at college that he was likely going to pursue a law degree, regardless of his major. Volck ultimately earned a BA in Communications from IU with a minor from the Kelley School of Business in 2011.

During his senior year at IU, Volck interned at a pair of local law offices in Bloomington, Ind. One person who was especially supportive of this decision was Volck’s uncle, a sole practitioner in Baltimore whose legal career was a primary motivation for Volck opting to pursue law in the first place.

After a tough decision, Volck opted to return home for law school, enrolling in the College of Law’s Class of 2014. In the last couple years, he has become especially interested in business law, in part due to his minor at IU, while also influenced by many of his college friends who studied business and now work in the field. As a result, he is now pursuing a joint JD/MBA. Typically, students attend a year at the College of Law while spending the second year out of four at the UC Lindner College of Business. However, Volck is taking a different route by loading up on credits this semester. He will then take a few business courses during his traditional 3L year, sit for the bar with this class, and then spend the 2014-15 year at the business school.

Externships Provide Lots of Opportunity

While Volck is currently preparing for a career as in-house counsel, his experiences last summer externing for Magistrate Judge Karen Litkovitz ’84 at the United States District Court, Southern District of Ohio, opened up his eyes to litigation. “For a 1L summer, I had a really excellent experience,” Volck said.

Throughout the summer, Volck worked with Magistrate Judge Litkovitz’s clerks – College of Law graduates Erica Faaborg '06 and Laura Ahern '85 – in helping draft various opinions before the judge made her corrections.  “(Magistrate Judge Litkovitz) has final say over absolutely everything, but I felt involved with the whole process,” Volck said.

Volck noted his 1L civil procedure and research and writing classes were especially valuable during his summer, but his research and writing skills especially improved as he was “doing it every day.”

The current 2L was appreciative of Magistrate Judge Litkovitz bringing him into settlement conferences, hearings, and other proceedings to observe and take notes. Other judges were also very welcoming, including Chief Judge Susan Dlott. At the end of the summer, Judge Michael Barrett ’77, United States District Court of the Southern District of Ohio, held a mock trial for all the judges’ externs, which allowed Volck to argue in front of Magistrate Judge Stephanie Bowman and a live jury.

“That’s when I really discovered I liked litigation,” Volck said, noting the “competitive edge” involved.

This summer, Volck will be working in New York with Bruce Eichner ’69 and The Continuum Company. Volck is the 2013 Eichner Fellow. “I’m really excited about that. I have never been to New York before,” he said, who pursued this experience for the opportunity to work with in-house counsel and gain experience in business development.

Volck is a member of the Moot Court Program and also a Tenant Information Project volunteer. Last semester, he and 3L Casey Kirchberg participated in an ABA Negotiations competition at Cooley Law School in Michigan. Professor Marjorie Aaron, director of the Center for Practice, and adjunct professor Jim Lawrence of Frost Brown Todd coached Volck and Kirchberg, as well as another pair from the College of Law.

In his free time, Volck enjoys doing outdoor activities such as hunting, hiking, and fishing. He also enjoys attending Reds games and listening to live music.

By Jordan Cohen, ‘13

From Broadcasting to Law—Alex Doyle Plans on Career as a Prosecutor


 Alex Doyle arrived on campus at UC in September 2006. Six and a half years later, she’s still here. Doyle, a native Cincinnatian, graduated with a degree in Electronic Media from the College Conservatory of Music in 2010 and, in two months, she will earn her JD from the College of Law.

“Being at UC for seven years has been the best experience possible for someone like me,” Doyle said. “I love UC and Cincinnati, and I would not have changed my time here for the world!”

Doyle grew up on the West Side and attended St. Ursula Academy, where she excelled both in the classroom and in the swimming pool. Doyle chose to attend UC, where she was offered a swimming scholarship, although she opted for a more traditional college life after one year of swimming for UC. She joined a sorority, became the president of UC’s student television station and even interned at CNN in Atlanta, where she managed social media networking for “CNN Newsroom with Rick Sanchez.”

Doyle’s interest in law school was first piqued by an undergraduate media law course. She was passionate about media and law had always interested her, so she jumped at the opportunity to take the course. In the end, it helped lead her toward law school and, ultimately, at UC.

“I have always been a homebody and being lucky enough to have a highly ranked law school in my hometown was a great coincidence for me,” said Doyle, who complimented the Admissions staff that made her feel welcome and accepted before she even submitted her application.

When Doyle began law school, she thought about focusing on media law and possibly continuing to pursue a career as a news anchor. However, she has since fallen in love with prosecution.

“I think I have always had a mind that is geared toward prosecution, and being in a courtroom most of the day and getting to meet lots of people is something that is right up my alley,” she said.

Doyle’s working experience and a College of Law clinical experience have certainly helped in her potential pursuit of a career inside the courtroom. After working with a Northern Kentucky attorney during the summer following 1L year, Doyle spent this past summer clerking for Judge Robert P. Ruehlman of the Hamilton County Court of Common Pleas.

Last semester, she enrolled in the College’s Domestic Violence and Civil Protection Order Clinic. Doyle utilized a legal intern certificate to litigate in front of magistrates and judges, and advocate for victims of domestic violence. This semester, she is participating in an independent study project with Hamilton County Prosecutor David Prem, through which she has been able to research, write briefs and memoranda, and shadow the prosecutor.

“The most meaningful classes have been the practical experiences, by far,” said Doyle, who also externed last spring with UC’s Intellectual Property Office. “In my three years at UC Law, I have worked at a small firm, completed research for a professor (James O’Reilly, Volunteer Professor of Law), worked at the Hamilton County courthouse for a judge, participated in the externship program and the DV clinic, and participated in an independent study. I feel like I have had the opportunity to be introduced to almost everything offered at UC Law.”

Doyle has also been involved with various activities at the College of Law, including serving as the current vice president of the Student Bar Association.

Outside of school and studying, Doyle enjoys participating in various running and swimming events. Last spring, she ran the full Flying Pig Marathon and plans to run the half marathon this year, on May 5, with her fiancée. Last October, Doyle finished first in her age group in the Great Ohio River Swim, while she has also twice run the Disney Princess Half Marathon at Walt Disney World (wearing a pink tutu), among other events.

By Jordan Cohen, ‘13

A Parisian’s View: Meet Fanny Delaunay


 Fanny Delaunay ’14 loves it in Cincinnati. The second year law student currently resides on the West Side with her husband, having also recently lived near campus, in Dayton, and in Florence, Ky. For all the moves Delaunay has made in the last five years, however, none was bigger than the one in 2008.

While Delaunay currently lives just miles from the banks of the Ohio River, this is vastly different from her hometown of Montpellier, France, a city of about 250,000 people along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea. 

Delaunay was born and raised in Montpellier, which is several hours south of Paris, but just two hours from Spain and four hours from Italy. She began her college education in 2005 at Montpellier III, where she studied business and foreign languages (English, German and Chinese).  Delaunay grew especially fond of German and, as a result, opted to study at Germany’s Ruprecht Karls University for a year, at age 17.

“I worked there, I volunteered, went to school – the whole thing – and, then, there I met someone from Cincinnati,” Delaunay said. “He was an exchange student too, we were both there studying German, we were in class together.”

Delaunay began dating this American exchange student, Travis Burke, who not long after his return to the United States began classes at the College of Law in the fall of 2007. Delaunay had another year of school left, although French students only need three years to complete a bachelor’s degree, so she returned to France. Delaunay knew she wanted to come to the United States after graduation to be with Burke, but to do so she realized she would need to earn some money first.

“I got a job at the (Montpellier – Méditerranée) Airport because it was one of the only places where I could do the first shift,” she said. “I was working from 5:00 in the morning to 1:00 (p.m.), so then I took all my classes in the afternoon. I had a full-time job, 40 hours a week, and then, on top of that, I went to school full time. But I just took all my classes in the afternoon, so that I could save enough money to pay for Xavier.”

Coming to America

After completing her education in France, Delaunay obtained a one-year student visa and came to Cincinnati to be with Burke and improve her English through classes at Xavier University. Delaunay was supposed to stay for only one year, but five years later she is still here and now married to Burke, a 2010 College of Law graduate.

This was clearly a significant move for Delaunay, who not only had never been to the United States, but did not even know precisely where her future home was actually located within the country. “When I moved here, I don’t think I knew where it was on the map,” she said.

Delaunay began taking English classes at Xavier through the English as a Second Language, or ESL, program. While in this Intensive English Program, Delaunay was told her English skills were good enough and that she would benefit by taking “normal [regular] classes.” Thus, she began taking business courses, but immigration issues arose as her one year student visa was set to expire.

She and Burke were married on October 18, 2008, so Delaunay was allowed to stay in Cincinnati, but she was not initially allowed to work. A year after her husband earned his law degree from UC, Delaunay enrolled in the College of Law’s Class of 2014, after flirting with the prospect of pursuing an MBA.

Life in Cincinnati

Having recently completed her third of six semesters at the College of Law, Delaunay has enjoyed her law school career to date.

“I love it,” she said. “I think I like the second year better than the first year; just the fact you can choose your own classes makes it a little more interesting. “

Looking forward, Delaunay is not extremely interested in working at a large law firm, although the idea of working as in-house counsel is appealing to her. Delaunay also enjoyed her Federal Income Tax course in the fall semester and is considering taking more tax classes.  Last summer, Delaunay worked downtown at the Attorney General’s office, while also doing some in-house work at a printing company in Indianapolis.

When not studying or working, Delaunay enjoys trying “real U.S. food” around town.

“For example, Rookwood Pottery has the best hamburgers ever,” said Delaunay, whose review of Skyline Chili was not nearly as favorable.

While she often cooks her own French food, Delaunay does go to some of the local French restaurants, perhaps her favorite being Jean-Robert’s Table. Delaunay also enjoys painting anything – whether that is more traditional art or the upstairs of her house.

The second year law student is an only child and is hopeful that her parents also make the move from France to Cincinnati.

“They love it,” Delaunay said, noting that they go on big trips when her parents are in town, and she has now been to 28 states.

“Last year we went to the Grand Canyon,” she said. “It feels kind of like you’re in a movie. You cannot see it anywhere else.”

By Jordan Cohen, ‘13