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Faculty News
Summer 2004 Issue

Marjorie Aaron Visiting Assistant Professor of Law
Director, Center for Negotiation & Problem Solving

Photo of Professor AaronMarjorie presented Insulting First Offers and Other Quagmires at the American College of Civil Trial Mediators’ Conference in Bar Harbor, Maine. She completed a solicited chapter, Assisting Settlement Decisions with Numbers, Trees and Maps for a Handbook on Dispute Resolution (forthcoming, Harvard Law School Program on Negotiation).

Profile of Professor Aaron :: Center for Practice in Negotiation & Problem Solving


Marianna Brown Bettman Visiting Professor of Law
Photo of Professor BettmanMarianna’s article, Highlights of the Ohio Supreme Court June 2002-June 2003, was accepted for publication in the Capital University Law Review. She wrote her monthly American Israelite columns on:
• Whether age and inexperience should be taken into account in deciding whether juveniles are in custody and need to be given Miranda warnings (Yarborough v. Alvarado).
• Whether the refusal to give the police your name can be a crime (Hibel v. Sixth Judicial District Court of Nevada).

Profile of Professor Bettman


Joseph Biancalana Professor of Law
Photo of Professor BiancalanaJoseph’s article, The Development of the Penal Bond with Conditional Defeasance, was accepted for publication in the Journal of Legal History.

Profile of Professor Biancalana


Kristin J. Kalsem Assistant Professor of Law
Photo of Professor BrandserKristin presented Women and Debt as part of the College of Law’s Summer Faculty Scholarship Series (www.law.uc.edu/faculty/summerscholars04.pdf).

Profile of Professor Kalsem


A. Christopher Bryant Associate Professor of Law
Photo of Professor Bryant Chris presented The Tenth Amendment and Federal Morals Legislation as part of the College of Law’s Summer Faculty Scholarship Series (www.law.uc.edu/faculty/summerscholars04.pdf). He taught a dozen high school teachers on the Freedoms of Speech and Assembly at the Ohio Center for Law Related Education’s We The People Summer Institute (Columbus, OH).

Several of Chris’s articles were cited in several prestigious sources:
Remanding to Congress: The Supreme Court's New “On the Record” Constitutional Review of Federal Statutes, 86 Cornell L. Rev. 328 (2001) (with Timothy J. Simone), in Bryan R.Whittaker, A Legislative Strategy Conditioned on Corruption: Regulating Campaign Financing after McConnell v. FEC, 79 Indiana L.J. 1063 (2004), Alexander Tsesis, Furthering American Freedom: Civil Rights & the Thirteenth Amendment, 45 Boston College L. Rev. 307 (2004), and Suzanna Sherry, The Unmaking of a Precedent, 55 Supreme Court Rev. 231 (2003).
• Youngstown Revisited, 29 Hastings Const. L.Q. 373 (2002) (with Carl Tobias), in Carl Tobias, Punishment and the War on Terrorism, 6 Univ. Pennsylvania J. Const’l L. 1116 (2004).
• Quirin Revisited, 2003 Wisconsin L. Rev. 309 (with Carl Tobias), in Richard H. Fallon, et al., Hart & Weschler’s Federal Courts and the Federal System (Foundation Press, 2004 Supp.), and Jordan J. Paust, Post-9/11 Overreaction and Fallacies Regarding War and Defense, Guantanamo, the Status of Persons, Treatment, Judicial Review of Detention, and Due Process in Military Commissions, 79 Notre Dame L. Rev. 1335 (2004).

Profile of Professor Bryant


Paul L. Caron Charles Hartsock Professor of Law
Director, Faculty Projects

Photo of Professor CaronOver the summer, Paul was a Visiting Professor of Law at the University of San Diego School of Law, where he taught the basic federal income tax course and presented Taking Back the Law School Classroom: Using Technology to Foster Active Student Learning, his forthcoming article in 54 J. of Legal Educ. (2004) (http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=527522).

He presented Measuring Scholarly Productivity and Impact Through SSRN as part of the College of Law’s Summer Faculty Scholarship Series (http://www.law.uc.edu/faculty/summerscholars04.pdf).

Foundation Press approved the 15th book in Paul’s Law Stories Series: Evidence Stories (Richard O. Lempert (Michigan)) (www.fdpress.com/fdpress/whatsnew.htm#lawstories).

LexisNexis approved the 7th book in Paul’s Graduate Tax Series: Tax Ethics (Linda Galler (Hofstra) & Michael Lang (Chapman)) (www.law.uc.edu/taxprof/blog/gradtaxseries.pdf).

In the four months since its launch, Paul’s TaxProf Blog (http://taxprof.typepad.com), a combination web site and blog with permanent resources and daily information for tax professors, has received over 85,000 visitors. It was featured in the July 1 Wall Street Journal (http://www.lawprofessorblogs.com/press/caronWJS040701.pdf).

Paul published several issues of his Tax Law Abstracts e-journals www.ssrn.com:
• 16 issues of Tax Law & Policy (vol. 5, nos. 17-32) (co-edited with Joseph Bankman (Stanford)).
• 16 issues of Practitioner Series (vol. 4, nos. 17-32) (co-edited with Joseph Bankman (Stanford)).
• 4 issues of International & Comparative Tax (vol. 4, nos. 5-8) (co-edited with Robert A. Green (Cornell)).

Paul’s book, Tax Stories (Foundation Press, 2003), was reviewed in Book Notes, 29 L. Social Inquiry 497 (2004), and cited in Debora L. Threedy, Unearthing Subversion with Legal Archaeology, 13 Texas J. Women & L. 133 (2003). He was quoted in IRS Files Tax Lien Against Rose, Cincinnati Enquirer, Aug. 20, 2004 (http://reds.enquirer.com/2004/08/20/rose20.html).

Profile of Professor Caron


Thomas D. Eisele Professor of Law
Photo of Professor EiseleTom’s articles, Bitter Knowledge: Socrates and Teaching by Disillusionment, 45 Mercer L. Rev. 587 (1994), and The Poverty of Socratic Questioning: Asking and Answering in the Meno, 63 Univ. Cincinnati L. Rev. 221 (1994), were cited in Morrison Torrey, You Call That Education?, 19 Wisconsin Women’s L.J. 93 (2004).

Profile of Professor Eisele


Adam Feibelman Assistant Professor of Law
Photo of Professor FeibelmanAdam presented Predatory Lending and Assignee Liability as part of the College of Law’s Summer Faculty Scholarship Series (www.law.uc.edu/faculty/summerscholars04.pdf).

Profile of Professor Feibelman


Rafael Gely Professor of Law
Photo of Professor GelyRafael presented The Economics of Workplace Rights as part of the College of Law’s Summer Faculty Scholarship Series (www.law.uc.edu/faculty/summerscholars04.pdf). Several of his article were cited in prestigious law reviews:

A Rational Choice Theory of Supreme Court Statutory Decisions with Applications to the State Farm and Grove City Cases, 6 J. L. Econ. & Org. 263 (1990) (with Pablo T. Spiller), in Daniel B. Rodriguez, Of Gift Horses and Great Expectations: Remands without Vacatur in Administrative Law, 36 Arizona State L. J. 599 (2004).
The Political Economy of Supreme Court Constitutional Decisions: The Case of Roosevelt’s Court-Packing Plan, 12 Int’l Rev. L. & Econ. 45 (1992) (with Pablo T. Spiller), in Richard H. Steinberg, Judicial Lawmaking at the WTO: Discursive, Constitutional, and Political Constraints, 98 American J. Int’l L. 247 (2004).
Restructuring Public Employees’ Political Activities: Good Government or Partisan Politics?, 37 Houston L. Rev. 775 (2000) (with Timothy D. Chandler), in Clifford J. Rosky, Force, Inc.: The Privatization of Punishment, Policing, and Military Force in Liberal States, 36 Connecticut L. Rev. 879 (2004).
Maternity Leave under the FMLA: An Analysis of the Litigation Experience, 15 Washington Univ. J. L. & Policy 143 (2004) (with Timothy Chandler), in Pauline T. Kim, The Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993: Ten Years of Experience, 15 Washington Univ. J. L. & Policy 1 (2004).

Profile of Professor Gely


Mark A. Godsey Assistant Professor of Law
Faculty Director, Lois and Richard Rosenthal Institute for Justice, Ohio Innocence Project

Photo of Professor GodseyMark published The Innocence Revolution and Our “Evolving Standards of Decency” in Death Penalty Jurisprudence, 29 Univ. Dayton L. Rev. 1 (2004) (symposium) (with 3L Thomas Pulley). He completed an article, Rethinking the Involuntary Confession Rule: Toward a Workable Test for Identifying Compelled Self-Incrimination, which is circulating among various law reviews. Mark presented the article at the Ohio Legal Scholars Conference in Akron and as part of the College of Law’s Summer Faculty Scholarship Series (www.law.uc.edu/faculty/summerscholars04.pdf).

Two of Mark’s articles were cited in prestigious law reviews:
Educational Inequalities, the Myth of Meritocracy, and the Silencing of Minority Voices: The Need for Diversity on America's Law Reviews, 12 Harvard BlackLetter L.J. 59 (1995), in John Valery White, What is Affirmative Action? 78 Tulane L. Rev. 2117 (2004).
• Miranda’s Final Frontier--The International Arena: A Critical Analysis of United States v. Bin Laden, and a Proposal for a New Miranda Exception Abroad, 51 Duke L.J. 1703 (2002), in Stephen A. Saltzburg & Daniel J. Capra, American Criminal Procedure: Cases and Commentary (West Group, 7th ed. 2004), Kim Lane Scheppele, Law in a Time of Emergency: States of Exception and the Temptations of 9/11, 6 Univ. Pennsylvania J. Const. L. 1001 (2004), Jonathan F. Lenzner, From a Pakistani Stationhouse to the Federal Courthouse: A Confession’s Uncertain Journey in the U.S.-led War on Terror, 12 Cardozo J. Int’l & Comp. L. 297 (2004), and Marcy Strauss, Torture, 48 New York L. Rev. 201 (2004).

Mark and the Ohio Innocence Project made several appearances in the local media:
• On June 22, Mark appeared as a guest on Bill Cunningham’s show on 700WLW radio
Characters Will Fight for Causes at ETC, Cincinnati Post, June 23, 2004 (www.cincypost.com/2004/06/23/etc062304.html)
Prosecutor Unswayed by Innocence Project, Cincinnati Enquirer, July 23, 2004 (www.enquirer.com/editions/2004/07/23/loc_innocence22.html)
Critics Decry Role of Witness, Cincinnati Post, July 26, 2004 (www.cincypost.com/2004/07/26/eye072604.html)
Springer To Appear at OTR Stage, Cincinnati Post, Aug. 31, 2004 (www.cincypost.com/2004/08/31/spring083104.html)

Profile of Professor Godsey :: Lois and Richard Rosenthal Institute for Justice/Ohio Innocence Project


Emily Houh Associate Professor of Law
Photo of Professor HouhEmily completed two articles, The Doctrine of Good Faith in Contract Law: Loading an Empty Vessel with Public Law Norms, and Critical Race Realism: Reclaiming the Antidiscrimination Principle through the Doctrine of Good Faith in Contract Law, which are circulating among various law reviews. She presented the latter article as part of the College of Law’s Summer Faculty Scholarship Series (www.law.uc.edu/faculty/summerscholars04.pdf).

Profile of Professor Houh


Christo Lassiter Professor of Law
Photo of Professor LassiterChristo agreed to teach a week-long course on terrorism in the West African country of Mali. The course is sponsored by the Defense Institute of International Legal Studies (www.dsca.mil/diils) and the U.S. Departments of State and Defense. He taught a similar course in Argentina in April.

Two of Christo’s articles were cited in prestigious sources:
The New Race Cases and the Politics of Public Policy, 12 J. L. & Policy 411 (1996), in Ronald Turner, The Too-Many-Minorities and Racegoating Dynamics of the Anti-Affirmative-Action Position: From Bakke to Grutter and Beyond, 30 Hastings Const. L.Q. 445 (2003).
TV or Not TV–That is the Question, 86 J. Criminal. L. & Criminology 928 (1996), in Kevin F. O’Malley, et al., Federal Jury Practice and Instructions, (West Group, 2004 Supp.).

Profile of Professor Lassiter


Bert B. Lockwood, Jr. Distinguished Service Professor of Law
Director, Urban Morgan Institute for Human Rights

Photo of Professor LockwoodBert arranged for six distinguished visitors to the College of Law from Indonesia (www.law.uc.edu/current/umorganvisitors0405/index.html).

Profile of Professor Lockwood :: Urban Morgan Institute for Human Rights


S. Elizabeth Malloy Professor of Law
Director, Glen M. Weaver Institute for Law & Psychiatry

Photo of Professor MalloyBetsy published Overcoming the Obstacles of Garrett: An “As Applied” Saving Construction for the ADA’s Title II, 39 Wake Forest L. Rev. 133 (2004) (symposium) (with Timothy J. Cahill, College of Law Class of 2003). Two of her articles were cited in prestigious law reviews:
Recalibrating the Cost of Harm Advocacy: Getting beyond Brandenburg, 41 William & Mary L. Rev. 1159 (2000) (with Ronald J. Krotoszynski, Jr.), in Ronald J. Krotoszynski, Jr., A Comparative Perspective on the First Amendment: Free Speech, Militant Democracy, and the Primacy of Dignity as a Preferred Constitutional Value in Germany, 78 Tulane L. Rev. 1549 (2004).
Something Borrowed, Something Blue: Why Disability Law Claims are Different, 33 Connecticut L. Rev. 603 (2001), in Ronald Turner, The Americans with Disabilities Act and the Workplace: A Study of the Supreme Court's Disabling Choices and Decisions, 60 New York Univ. Annual Survey American L. 379 (2004).

Profile of Professor Malloy :: Glen M. Weaver Institute for Law and Psychiatry


Bradford C. Mank James B. Helmer Jr. Professor of Law
Photo of Professor MankBrad published Can Congress Regulate Intrastate Endangered Species Under the Commerce Clause?, 69 Brooklyn L. Rev. 923 (2004). He presented Standing and Climate Change as part of the College of Law’s Summer Faculty Scholarship Series (www.law.uc.edu/faculty/summerscholars04.pdf).

Several of Brad’s scholarly works were cited in prestigious law reviews:
The Environmental Protection Agency's Project XL and Other Reform Initiatives: The Need for Legislative Authorization, 25 Ecology L.Q. 1 (1998), in Dennis D. Hirsch, Lean and Green? Environmental Law and Policy and the Flexible Production Economy, 79 Indiana L J. 611 (2004).
Executive Order 12,898, in The Law of Environmental Justice: Theories and Procedures to Address Disproportionate Risks (Michael B. Gerrard ed., 1999), in Jane Chuang, Who Should Win the Garbage Wars? Lessons from The Low-level Radioactive Waste Policy Act, 72 Fordham L. Rev. 2403 (2004).
Suing under § 1983: The Future after Gonzaga University v. Doe, 39 Houston L. Rev. 1417 (2003), in Amy M. Reichbach, The Power Behind the Promise: Enforcing No Child Left Behind to Improve Education, 45 Boston College L. Rev. 667 (2004).

Profile of Professor Mank


Donna M. Nagy Charles Hartsock Professor of Law
Associate Dean, Faculty Development

Photo of Professor NagyDonna presented “Private” Corporations with Public Power as part of the College of Law’s Summer Faculty Scholarship Series (www.law.uc.edu/faculty/summerscholars04.pdf). Two of Donna’s scholarly works were cited in prestigious sources:
Reframing the Misappropriation Theory of Insider Trading Liability: A Post-O’Hagan Suggestion, 59 Ohio St. L.J. 1223 (1998), in Thomas Lee Hazen, Law of Securities Regulation (West Group, 2004 Supp.), and Benjamin Alarie, Dividend Entitlements and Intermediate Default Rules, 9 Stanford J. L. Business & Finance 135 (2004).
Securities Litigation and Enforcement: Cases and Materials (West Group, 2003) (with Richard W. Painter & Margaret V. Sachs), in Amy Gibbs, It’s About Time: The Scope of Section 804 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, 38 Georgia L. Rev. 1403 (2004).

Profile of Professor Nagy


William J. Rands Professor of Law
Photo of Professor RandsBill’s article, Passthrough Entities and Their Unprincipled Differences under Federal Tax Law, 49 S.M.U. L. Rev. 15 (1995), was cited in Daniel S. Goldberg, Choice of Entity for a Venture Capital Start-up: The Myth of Incorporation, 55 Tax Lawyer 923 (2002).

Profile of Professor Rands


Ronna G. Schneider Professor of Law
Photo of Professor SchneiderTwo of Ronna’s articles were cited in prestigious law reviews:
Sexual Harassment and Higher Education, 65 Texas L. Rev. 525 (1987), in David S. Cohen, Limiting Gebser: Institutional Liability for Non-harassment Sex Discrimination under Title IX, 39 Wake Forest L. Rev. 311 (2004).
Getting Help with Their Homework: Schools, Lower Courts, and the Supreme Court Justices Look for Answers under the Establishment Clause, 53 Administrative L. Rev. 943 (2001), in Aharon R. Junkins, The Establishment Clause’s Effect on Kosher Food Laws: Will the Jewish Meal Soon Become Harder to Swallow in Georgia?, 38 Georgia L. Rev. 1067 (2004).

Ronna was pictured with her former law school moot court debate partner John Kerry on his June campaign stop in Cincinnati: Kerry Raises $1M in Appearance Here, Cincinnati Post, June 16, 2004, at A1.

Profile of Professor Schneider


Michael E. Solimine Donald P. Klekamp Professor of Law
Director, Extern Program

Photo of Professor SolimineMichael presented Judicial Stratification and the Reputations of the United States Courts of Appeals, his article for the Spring 2005 Florida State University symposium on Empirical Measures of Judicial Performance (www.law.fsu.edu/journals/ lawreview/judicialperformance.php), as part of the College of Law’s Summer Faculty Scholarship Series (www.law.uc.edu/faculty/summerscholars04.pdf)

Several of his books and articles were cited in a variety of prestigious sources:
Constitutional Litigation in Federal and State Courts: An Empirical Analysis of Judicial Parity, 10 Hastings Const’l L.Q. 213 (1983), Respecting State Courts: The Inevitability of Judicial Federalism (Greenwood, 1999) (with James L. Walker), and Supreme Court Monitoring of State Courts in the Twenty-First Century, 35 Indiana L. Rev. 335 (2002) (with James L. Walker) in Barry Friedman, Under the Law of Federal Jurisdiction: Allocating Cases Between Federal and State Courts, 104 Columbia L. Rev. 1211 (2004).
Constitutional Litigation in Federal and State Courts: An Empirical Analysis of Judicial Parity, 10 Hastings Const’l L.Q. 213 (1983), Shoring Up Article III: Legislative Court Doctrine in the Post CFTC v. Schor Era, 68 Boston Univ. L. Rev. 85 (1988) (with Richard B. Saphire), Rethinking Exclusive Federal Jurisdiction, 52 Univ. Pittsburgh L. Rev. 383 (1991), Removal, Remands, and Reforming Federal Appellate Review, 58 Missouri L. Rev. 287 (1993), and Supreme Court Monitoring of State Courts in the Twenty-First Century, 35 Ind. L. Rev. 335 (2002), in Peter W. Low & John C. Jeffries, Jr., Federal Courts and the Law of Federal State Relations (Foundation Press, 5th ed. 2004).
Revitalizing Interlocutory Appeals in the Federal Courts, 58 Geo. Wash. L. Rev.1165 (1990), in Stephen C. Yeazell, Civil Procedure (Aspen, 6th ed. 2004).
Next Word? Congressional Response to Supreme Court Statutory Decisions, 65 Temple Law Review 425 (1992)(with James L. Walker), in Jeb Barnes, Overruled? Legislative Overrides, Pluralism, and Contemporary Court-Congress Relations (Stanford Univ. Press 2004).
Forum-Selection Clauses and the Privatization of Procedure, 25 Cornell Int’l L.J. 51(1992), in Jason Webb Yackee, A Matter of Good Form: The (Downsized) Hague Judgments Convention and Conditions of Formal Validity for the Enforcement of Forum Selection Agreements, 53 Duke L.J. 1179 (2004).
Rethinking Feminist Judging, 70 Indiana L.J. 891 (1995) (with Susan E. Wheatley), in Gregory C. Sisk, et al, Searching for the Soul of Judicial Decisionmaking: An Empirical Study of Religious Freedom Decisions, 65 Ohio St. L.J. 491 (2004).
The Three-Judge District Court in Voting Rights Litigation, 30 Michigan J. L. Reform 79 (1996), in C. Bryan Wilson, Note, What's a Federalist to Do? The Impending Clash between Textualism and Federalism in State Congressional Redistricting Suits under Article I, Section 4, 53 Duke L.J. 1367 (2004).
The Quiet Revolution in Personal Jurisdiction, 73 Tulane L. Rev. 1 (1998), in Roxanne Barton Conlin & Gregory S. Cusimano, ATLA’s Litigating Tort Cases (West Group, 2004 Supp.).
Competitive Federalism and Interstate Recognition of Marriage, 32 Creighton L. Rev. 83 (1998), in Kevin J. Worthen, Who Decides and What Difference Does it Make? Defining Marriage in “Our Democratic, Federal Republic,” 18 BYU J. Public Law 273 (2004).
Deciding to Decide: Class Action Certification and Interlocutory Review by the United States Courts of Appeals Under Rule 23(f), 41 William & Mary Law Review 1531 (2000)(with Christine Oliver Hines, College of Law Class of 1999), in Richard L. Marcus & Edward F. Sherman, Complex Litigation (West Group, 4th ed. 2004).
The False Promise of Judicial Elections in Ohio, 30 Capital L. Rev. 559 (2002) (symposium), in Steven Zeidman, To Elect or Not to Elect: A Case Study of Judicial Selection in New York City 1977-2000, 37 Univ. Michigan J. L. Reform 791 (2004).
Formalism, Pragmatism, and the Conservative Critique of the Eleventh Amendment, 101 Michigan L. Rev.1463 (2003), in Richard H. Fallon, et al., Hart & Wechsler’s The Federal Courts and the Federal System (Foundation Press, 2004 Supp.).

Profile of Professor Solimine


Adam N. Steinman Assistant Professor of Law
Photo of Professor SteinmanAdam joined the faculty over the summer from Perkins Coie in Seattle. (www.law.uc.edu/current/newfac04/index.html). He published A Constitution for Judicial Lawmaking, 65 Univ. Pittsburgh L. Rev. 545 (2004).

Adam wrote an amicus brief for the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers (NACDL), which contributed to the Court’s decision in Blakely v. Washington, 124 S.Ct. 2531 (2004), holding that facts supporting an exceptional sentence in excess of the standard sentencing range must be found by a jury beyond a reasonable doubt. Justice Scalia’s majority opinion specifically mentioned the NACDL brief, and various media accounts have noted NACDL’s involvement in the case (e.g., Linda Greenhouse, Justices, in 5-4 Vote, Raise Doubts on Sentencing Rules, N.Y. Times, June 25, 2004 (www.nytimes.com/2004/06/25/politics/25SCOT.final.html? ex=1094616000&en=a47c0ecfe61ef463& ei=5070&pagewanted=prit&position=)).

Adam’s article, Reconceptualizing Federal Habeas Corpus for State Prisoners: How Should AEDPA’s Standard of Review Operate After Williams v. Taylor?, 2001 Wisconsin L. Rev. 1493, was cited in Magery I. Miller, Note, A Different View of Habeas: Interpreting AEDPA’s “Adjudicated on the Merits” Clause When Habeas Corpus Is Understood as an Appellate Function of the Federal Courts, 72 Fordham L. Rev. 2593 (2004).

Profile of Professor Steinman


Suja Thomas Associate Professor of Law
Photo of Professor ThomasSuja completed an article, Judicial Modesty, which is circulating among various law reviews. She presented the article as part of the College of Law’s Summer Faculty Scholarship Series (www.law.uc.edu/faculty/summerscholars04.pdf). Suja’s Letter to the Editor, Studies of Drug Ratio are Still Lacking, was published in the July 4 New York Times, § 8, at 8 (http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html? res=F40F1EF9345C0C778CDDAE0894DC404482)

Profile of Professor Thomas


Joseph P. Tomain Dean & Nippert Professor of Law
Photo of Dean TomainOn August 27, Joe resigned as Dean of the College of Law, effective October 1 (www.law.uc.edu/current/tomain041001/index.html).

Several of his scholarly works were cited in prestigious law reviews:
Regulatory Law and Policy: Cases and Materials (LexisNexis, 3d ed. 2003) (with Sidney A. Shapiro), in Harry N. Niska, The European Union Trips over the U.S. Constitution: Can the First Amendment Save the Bologna that has a First Name?, 13 Minnesota J. Global Trade 413 (2004).
networkindustries.gov.reg, 48 Kansas. L. Rev. 829 (2000), in Reza Dibadj, Saving Antitrust, 75 Univ. Colorado L. Rev. 745 (2004).

In addition, Joe was listed as a Legal Expert Participant in Theodore W. Ruger, et al., The Supreme Court Forecasting Project: Legal and Political Science Approaches to Predicting Supreme Court Decisionmaking, 104 Columbia L. Rev. 1150 (2004).

Profile of Dean Tomain


Verna L. Williams Assistant Professor of Law
Photo of Professor WilliamsVerna presented More Than a Paycheck: Reparations, Education Reform, and Restorative Justice as part of the College of Law’s Summer Faculty Scholarship Series (www.law.uc.edu/faculty/summerscholars04.pdf).

Profile of Professor Williams


Ingrid Brunk Wuerth Associate Professor of Law
Photo of Professor WuerthIngrid completed an article, Courts and the President’s War Powers: The Promise and Pitfalls of International Law as an Interpretive Tool, which is circulating among various law reviews. She presented the article as part of the College of Law’s Summer Faculty Scholarship Series (www.law.uc.edu/faculty/summerscholars04.pdf).

Ingrid’s forthcoming article, The President’s Power to Detain Enemy Combatants: Modern Lessons from Mr. Madison's Forgotten War, 98 Northwestern Univ. L. Rev. ___ (2004) (http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=467344), was cited by Justice Scalia in his dissenting opinion in Hamdi v. Rumsfeld, 124 S.Ct. 2633 (2004) (www.law.uc.edu/current/makingnews04sum/index.html#wuerth). The article also was cited by Stephen I. Vladeck, Note, The Detention Power, 22 Yale Law & Policy Rev. 153 (2004).

Ingrid’s article, Private Religious Choice in German and American Constitutional Law: Government Funding and Government Religious Speech, 31 Vanderbilt. J. Transnational L. 1127 (1998), was cited in Edward J. Eberle, Free Exercise of Religion in Germany and the United States, 78 Tulane L. Rev. 1023 (2004). She was quoted in Salyers Held Off on Filing Suit, Columbus Dispatch, June 11, 2004, at C1.

Profile of Professor Wuerth

Faculty News is edited by Paul L. Caron, Charles Hartsock Professor of Law and Director of Faculty Projects.
Back issues can be accessed from the Faculty News Archive.

     
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