Law

Coronavirus Short Course

COVID-19 and the Law

A short course for incoming students that bridges the gap between the impacts of COVID-19 and the Law.

All fall 2020 incoming students are invited to participate in this series of short courses presented by Cincinnati Law 1L faculty.

Each course is capped at 15 students, and you are asked to register for only two courses to start. If capacity allows, we will re-open registration and notify you of availability.

These courses are offered at no cost and for no academic credit.


Faculty Trailer

Video link: https://www.youtube.com/embed/b_QYhUx9dN8?rel=0

Course Details

Presenter: Professor Chris Bryant

The governmental responses to the public health threat posed by COVID-19 have raised countless issues under state and federal constitutions.  In my portion of our course, we will take a rather deep dive into two related federal court cases arising in nearby Kentucky challenging the application of a shelter-in-place order to religious services on the ground that doing so violated core commitments to religious freedom.  Though the facts of the two cases are relatively straightforward, they raise fundamental questions about both the meaning of the First Amendment as well as the roles of courts and legislatures in defining and protecting individual rights.  We will study and discuss those questions and reflect on what the recent episode teaches about some of the most fundamental issues confronting a society committed to ordered liberty.

Course Dates & Times

  • Session Closed (Full): Wednesday, 6/3 from 12-1 PM: Constitutional Law & COVID-19
  • Session Closed (Full): Friday, 6/12 from 12-1 PM: Constitutional Law & COVID-19
  • Tuesday, 6/23 from 12-1 PM: Constitutional Law & COVID-19

Course Materials

Presenter: Professor Mark Godsey

In this session, we will discuss the criminal justice system's response to the COVID crisis, including the recent release of the Ohio Innocence Project's two most recent clients, Christopher Smith and Isiah Andrews.  Both clients were high-risk for COVID-19 in prison, and both had their convictions overturned and were released from prison in the height of the lockdown.

Course Materials:

Course Dates & Times

  • Session Closed (Full): Thursday, 5/28 from 12-1 PM: Criminal Justice & COVID-19
  • Session Closed (Full): Friday, 6/5 from 12-1 PM: Criminal Justice & COVID-19
  • Monday, 6/8 from 12-1 PM: Criminal Justice & COVID-19

Presenter: Professor Emily Houh

In my session on "Covid-19 and Contracts," we'll talk about how the pandemic is impacting the ability of people and businesses to perform their contract obligations in varying contexts -- such as international commercial trade, employment contracts, and/or student loan contracts.  Specifically, I'll touch on what's known as the "impracticability" doctrine in Contracts, which allows parties to get out of their contract obligations in certain very limited circumstances -- like a global pandemic.  Through a discussion of the impracticability doctrine--which is based in "equity"--I hope to also explore with you some of the more theoretical aspects of the American contract law.  How, for example, does contract law work to both empower and dis-empower transactors in a market economy?  How has it been used to both level the playing field and put up barriers to economic equality?  And what, if anything, should contract law aim to do?  

Course Dates & Times

  • CLOSED: Wednesday, 5/27 from 12-1 PM: Contract Law & COVID-19
  • Wednesday, 6/10 from 12-1 PM: Contract Law & COVID-19
  • Wednesday, 6/17 from 12-1 PM: Contract Law & COVID-19

Presenter: Professor Betsy Malloy

If you are interested in the power of State officials, particularly state public health officials, during the time of the pandemic and the strategies they adopt to protect the  community , please join me for my presentation: Public Health: Isolation, Quarantine and Mandatory Vaccines and the Legacy of Jacobson v. Massachusetts. We will examine this over 100-year-old case and the broad authority it continues to provide our state health authorities when a public emergency exists. I look forward to meeting you!

Course Dates & Times

  • Session Closed (full): Tuesday, 5/26 from 12-1 PM: Public Health & COVID-19
  • Session Closed (full): Tuesday, 6/2 from 12-1 PM: Public Health & COVID-19

Course Materials

 

Presenter: Professor Sean Mangan

In this brief course, we will explore the COVID-19 pandemic and its effects on business and the legal industry.  Specifically, we will discuss three primary topics.  First, the impact of statutory relief programs within the CARES Act and the downstream effect of these programs.  Second, the pandemic’s implications for business law in general, with particular focus on business contracts, economic fallout, business infrastructure, and choice of entity.  Lastly, we will examine the impact of the pandemic on the legal industry, particularly private law firms and the implications for practice, hiring, and compensation.

Course Dates & Times

  • Session Closed (Full): Friday, 5/29 from 12-1 PM: Business Law & COVID-19
  • Session Closed (Full):Thursday, 6/18 from 12-1 PM: Business Law & COVID-19
  • Thursday, 6/25 from 12-1 PM: Business Law & COVID-19

Course Materials:

Presenter: Professor Meghan Morris

This session is an introductory conversation about some of the key ways in which Covid-19 has impacted property law. We will discuss issues such as government actions around evictions, foreclosures, and access to housing, as well as questions the shutdown orders raise for businesses with respect to insurance and the right to property. The session will touch upon specific experiences involving Covid-19 and property law, as well as the ways in which Covid-19 is shifting broad debates around the ways we use property to shape private and public life.

Course Dates & Times

  • Tuesday, 6/9 from 12-1 PM: Property Law & COVID-19
  • Thursday, 6/11 from 12-1 PM: Property Law & COVID-19
  • Tuesday, 6/16 from 12-1 PM: Property Law & COVID-19

Course Matierals

Presenter: Professor Sandra Sperino

Coffee with Professor Sperino.  Grab a cup of coffee (or other beverage of your choice) and join Professor Sperino to discuss how lawyers can help employers and workers respond to the pandemic. Employment law is ultimately about three themes: how we value each other as humans, the problems people have communicating and working with each other, and how we choose to structure power and voice in our society. Before class, watch a quick video giving you an overview of employment law and read the short article.  I am looking forward to giving you a preview of what it is like to practice in this area of law and to meet you!

Course Dates & Times

  • Session Closed (Full): Monday, 6/1 from 12-1 PM: Employment Law & COVID-19
  • Monday, 6/15 from 12-1 PM: Employment Law & COVID-19
  • Monday, 6/22 from 12-1 PM: Employment Law & COVID-19

Course Materials: