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Scheduled Maintenance: December 28th - 30th

The College of Law website and other computing resources will be temporarily inaccessible December 28th at 5:00 p.m. to December 30th at 10:00 a.m. due to a planned electrical outage.
Stephanie Hunter McMahon

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Stephanie Hunter McMahon

Professor of Law


Education

BA, Oglethorpe University
JD, Harvard Law School
MA, University of Virginia
PhD, University of Virginia

Areas of Interest

  • Legal History
  • Taxation

Professor McMahon teaches courses in both tax law and legal history and her research often combines her interest in these areas.  To date, Professor McMahon’s research has focused on the historical relationship between taxation and the public’s perception of taxation and, from that relationship, discovers lessons that history provides for improving today’s law.  In particular, Professor McMahon’s work has explored how women have been, and continue to be, affected by taxation, and how women have used issues of taxation to further their own rights.  Her writings have been published in peer-reviewed journals, Florida Tax Review, Law and History Review, and Pittsburgh Tax Review, as well as student-reviewed journals, Northwestern Law Review, Harvard Journal of Law and Gender, Journal of Legislation (Notre Dame), Nevada Law Journal, Wisconsin Journal of Law, Gender & Society.

A summa cum laude graduate of Oglethorpe University in Atlanta, GA (BA), a cum laude graduate of Harvard Law School, and a graduate with a Ph.D. from the University of Virginia, Professor McMahon has a strong interest in the development of fiscal issues in American history. Prior to joining the academic world, Professor McMahon spent several years practicing in the tax field.  She worked as a tax attorney at Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP in New York and at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP, also in New York. During graduate school, she worked at Nixon, Peabody LLP in Washington, D.C.  A former Samuel I. Golieb fellow, her current research explores the forces that led to changes in the taxation of divorce as a means of evaluating the effectiveness of resulting legislation.

Publications

Articles, Essays & Book Reviews

Presentations

  • What Does It All Mean? The Rhetorical Power of the Income Tax in the United States, 1861-1918, 2008 Policy History Conference (May 29-June 1, 2008)
  • To Save State Residents: States' Use of the Federal System of Government for Tax Reduction, UCLA Tax History Conference (July 15-16, 2007)
  • You Pay For What You Get: Fitting the U.S. Virgin Islands Within the American Territorial Structure During the Period 1917 through 1936, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Graduate Student Conference, Our Research Matters: New Dialogues on Latin America, the Caribbean and Latino Studies (April 30, 2005)
  • American Legal History
  • Business Tax
  • Federal Income Tax
  • Tax Policy