Law

Curricula

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Courses for Fall 2018
Course Name Course Description
Business Associations Business Associations. This course covers major topics in the law of agency, partnerships, limited partnerships, limited liability companies and corporations, as well selected aspects of the federal securities laws. This course will replace both Corporations I and Agency, Partnerships, and Unincorporated Associations. Any student who has taken Corporations I in the past may not take Business Associations. If you have taken Agency, Partnerships, and Unincorporated Associations in the past, you may take Business Associations.
Corporate Finance This course examines the legal rules governing financial transactions within a corporation and between the corporation and its shareholders. The course will also cover financing the corporation and organic changes, including mergers, consolidation, recapitalizations, and charter amendments. Prerequisite: Corporations I.
Crimmigration This course will focus on the historical and current relationship between criminal and immigration law. The class will look at the intersection both in the criminal justice system as well as the immigration court system. It will proceed in two parts. First, it will focus on procedural and substantive law. The goal during this part of the course is for students to gain a practical knowledge to take a non-citizen defendant from his arrest in the criminal system through his immigration proceeding with the ability to understand the consequences of the criminal conviction to his immigration status. Therefore, this part will focus on specific grounds of deportation and inadmissibility related to criminal conduct; analyzing the Immigration and Nationality Act, criminal law, and pertinent case law. This part will include topics such as mandatory detention, aggravated felonies, divisible statutes, crimes of moral turpitude, and Sixth Amendment right to counsel. Second, it will focus on policy. The course will discuss current federal, state and local governmental immigration policies; including immigration raids, cooperation between local law enforcement and the Department of Homeland Security as well as and local ordinances aimed at businesses and employers. Policy discussions will include issues of race, national origin, and ethnicity and its relationship, if any, to the increased use of the criminal justice system to enforce immigration law on national security and public safety grounds. This section will address topics including Secure Communities, 287(g), Operation Streamline and state and local immigration legislation such as SB 1070. The course may include class discussion, lectures, Customs and Border Patrol operations tour at CVG, and outside speakers.
Entrepren&CommDev Clinic Open to 3L’s only. Enrollment is limited to 8-10 students selected by the instructor. No later than the first day of class, students must have a “legal intern certificate” from the Office of Bar Admissions of the Supreme Court of Ohio. In this course, students will staff the Entrepreneurship and Community Development Clinic (ECDC), obtaining “hands on” experience representing local businesses and entrepreneurs on transactional legal issues critical to their success, including assistance and counseling on entity selection and formation; regulatory compliance and licensing; trademark/copyright protection; lease review and negotiation; contract preparation/review/negotiation; tax - exempt applications; and other legal issues confronting small businesses, both for-profit and nonprofit. Students also will learn how a small law office operates, including procedures for client intake, file maintenance, project tracking, timekeeping, and scheduling. In addition to attending the weekly class, students will be expected to spend approximately10-12 hours per week on their clinic work, with a minimum of 4 of those hours spent working in the clinic offices, located at the law school and the Hamilton County Business Center. The ECDC will represent primarily clients of limited financial means who cannot afford the services of the private bar and will not represent clients in litigation
Entrepren&CommDev FP Entrepreneurship & Community Development Clinic Field Placement. Students will also be concurrently enrolled in BCL7038.
Evidence The goal of this course is for students to know and be able to apply (1) the Federal Rules of Evidence governing relevance, unfair prejudice, character evidence, impeachment, hearsay, and opinion testimony; (2) the rules as they intersect with a few constitutional provisions, such as the Sixth Amendment confrontation right; and (3) some housekeeping rules, such as Rules 102-105, 201, 611, and the Best Evidence rule.
Federal Courts This course addresses issues of federalism and separation of powers raised by statutes and doctrines which establish and limit federal court jurisdiction. Among the matters addressed are standing, legislative courts, congressional power over federal jurisdiction, the Eleventh Amendment, and the abstention doctrines. Also considered are the role state courts play in the formation and application of doctrines.
Federal Income Tax This course is structured around the two dominant themes of the taxation of individuals under the Internal Revenue Code: what is income, and what is deductible; and when must the taxpayer recognize income, and when can the taxpayer deduct a particular expense. Also the course examines miscellaneous topics such as capital gains and losses, identifying the proper taxpayer, and others.
LR&W for LLMs Legal Research & Writing for LLM Students
Wills & Estates This course covers the variety of ways in which people can arrange for the passage of their property at their death. Students study common law and statutory methods of dealing with property left by a decedent who did or did not leave a will; the procedures and problems of creating, construing, contesting, or revoking wills; the concerns for providing for surviving spouses and other family members; fiduciary duties in the administration of estates and some of the methods for avoiding the probate of estates.
US Legal System (LLM) US Legal System (LLM)
Statutory Interpretation This course explores the enactment of statutes by federal and state legislators and the interpretation given by the courts and administrative agencies to such legislative enactments. The course will focus on various procedural, constitutional, and jurisprudential issues relating to the legislative and electoral processes embodied in our constitutional order, and to the methods of statutory interpretation employed by our courts and administrative agencies. Chief among the many aims of the course is to introduce students to the legal problems posed by legislative government, in the hopes that as practicing lawyers they will be more effective participants in the legislative process and the subsequent implementation and interpretation of statutes.
Secured Transactions This course focuses on laws governing secured transactions, specifically as set forth in Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code. The topics addressed include the creation and perfection of security interests in personal property, priorities and remedies upon default in these secured transactions, and the interactions of the laws governing secured transactions with the Bankruptcy Code.
Law, Literature & Philosophy Traditionally, lawyers have played central roles in the organization of society and the administration of justice. They also further the interests of their clients through persuasive argumentation. Using a number of "great books," this course will examine forms of argument and forms of legal authority.
Pretrial Litigation This course will focus solely on the litigation skills that an attorney must master in order to steer a civil case from the beginning of a dispute to the point immediately preceding a trial. Topics may include: development of the legal theory/theories in a case (causes of action and defenses); pleadings, including state and federal filing rules, proper parties, service considerations, electronic filing, and waiver of service of summons; development of discovery strategies; discovery, including interrogatories, requests for production of documents, requests for admissions, and motions to compel; depositions, taking and defending; experts, including retainer issues, drafting expert reports, and taking/defending expert depositions; pre-trial motion practice; trial-witness preparation; jury instructions and pre-trial statements; and court-ordered mediation and settlement.
Lawyering I: LR&W This course covers skills basic to competent legal research and writing. The students write objective memoranda of law based on hypothetical problems composed by the instructors. The course emphasizes issue recognition, case and statutory interpretation, legal analysis, and the use of plain English.
Lawyering I: LR&W This course covers skills basic to competent legal research and writing. The students write objective memoranda of law based on hypothetical problems composed by the instructors. The course emphasizes issue recognition, case and statutory interpretation, legal analysis, and the use of plain English.
Lawyering I: LR&W This course covers skills basic to competent legal research and writing. The students write objective memoranda of law based on hypothetical problems composed by the instructors. The course emphasizes issue recognition, case and statutory interpretation, legal analysis, and the use of plain English.
Lawyering I: LR&W This course covers skills basic to competent legal research and writing. The students write objective memoranda of law based on hypothetical problems composed by the instructors. The course emphasizes issue recognition, case and statutory interpretation, legal analysis, and the use of plain English.
Lawyering I: LR&W This course covers skills basic to competent legal research and writing. The students write objective memoranda of law based on hypothetical problems composed by the instructors. The course emphasizes issue recognition, case and statutory interpretation, legal analysis, and the use of plain English.
Intro to Intellectual Property This broadest and most basic course gives roughly equal time to the three primary federal doctrines in the area, copyright, trademark, and patent, and gives students a brief introduction to related state law doctrines such as rights of publicity and trade secrets. This course provides students with the basics of each doctrine as well as an understanding of the ways in which they interact with each other.
Legal Ethics In this course students consider the lawyer-client relationship in the context of realistic scenarios, evaluating the complete choices an ethical lawyer must make to establish an effective lawyer-client relationship. Following an examination of the ABA Model Rules and the Ohio Rules of Professional Conduct, students consider the ethical components of the lawyer-client relationship, with an emphasis on competency, confidentiality, and conflicts of interest. The course also includes substantial instruction in the history, goals, structure, values, and responsibilities of the legal profession and its members.
Legal Ethics In this course students consider the lawyer-client relationship in the context of realistic scenarios, evaluating the complete choices an ethical lawyer must make to establish an effective lawyer-client relationship. Following an examination of the ABA Model Rules and the Ohio Rules of Professional Conduct, students consider the ethical components of the lawyer-client relationship, with an emphasis on competency, confidentiality, and conflicts of interest. The course also includes substantial instruction in the history, goals, structure, values, and responsibilities of the legal profession and its members.
Legal Ethics In this course students consider the lawyer-client relationship in the context of realistic scenarios, evaluating the complete choices an ethical lawyer must make to establish an effective lawyer-client relationship. Following an examination of the ABA Model Rules and the Ohio Rules of Professional Conduct, students consider the ethical components of the lawyer-client relationship, with an emphasis on competency, confidentiality, and conflicts of interest. The course also includes substantial instruction in the history, goals, structure, values, and responsibilities of the legal profession and its members.
Client Counseling In this course, students consider the lawyer-client relationship in the context of realistic scenarios, examining the basic strategies and skills a lawyer must master in the lawyer-client relationship. Students will practice and demonstrate the skills of effective client communication and practice management. The instruction and simulations will be set in the business transaction context.
Torts Torts examines the three basic theories of civil (non-criminal) liability for injuries to persons and property. International torts, negligence and strict liability. These subjects are considered together with causation problems, defenses to liability (such as consent, self-defense, comparative negligence and assumption of risk), and affirmative duties.
Torts Torts examines the three basic theories of civil (non-criminal) liability for injuries to persons and property. International torts, negligence and strict liability. These subjects are considered together with causation problems, defenses to liability (such as consent, self-defense, comparative negligence and assumption of risk), and affirmative duties.
Civil Procedure I This course covers various aspects of civil litigation from the filing of a complaint up to the discovery process. Jurisdiction over the person, venue, and federal subject matter jurisdiction are explored. Coverage is also given to the decision in Erie RR v. Tompkins and its progeny, concerning the applicability of state law in federal courts. The remainder of the course is devoted to service of process, joinder of parties, counterclaims and amendments.
Freedom Center Journal:Staff The Freedom Center Journal of Law and History engages its readership on issues historically driving African-American intellectual thought while challenging its student membership to fully develop their individual talents to compete on terms of academic equality in an international society governed by law and legal institutions.
Civil Procedure I This course covers various aspects of civil litigation from the filing of a complaint up to the discovery process. Jurisdiction over the person, venue, and federal subject matter jurisdiction are explored. Coverage is also given to the decision in Erie RR v. Tompkins and its progeny, concerning the applicability of state law in federal courts. The remainder of the course is devoted to service of process, joinder of parties, counterclaims and amendments.
Constitutional Law I This is an introductory course covering judicial review, federalism, separation of powers, and equal protection.
Constitutional Law I This is an introductory course covering judicial review, federalism, separation of powers, and equal protection.
Constitutional Law I This is an introductory course covering judicial review, federalism, separation of powers, and equal protection.
Contracts This course covers basic concepts and doctrines in contract law, including the legal grounds for enforcement of promises, the role of consent in contract formation, contract remedies, and interpretation. Attention is given to both the common law of contracts and to Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code.
Contracts This course covers basic concepts and doctrines in contract law, including the legal grounds for enforcement of promises, the role of consent in contract formation, contract remedies, and interpretation. Attention is given to both the common law of contracts and to Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code.
Contracts This course covers basic concepts and doctrines in contract law, including the legal grounds for enforcement of promises, the role of consent in contract formation, contract remedies, and interpretation. Attention is given to both the common law of contracts and to Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code.
Freedom Center Journal:Staff The Freedom Center Journal of Law and History engages its readership on issues historically driving African-American intellectual thought while challenging its student membership to fully develop their individual talents to compete on terms of academic equality in an international society governed by law and legal institutions.
Freedom Center Journal Editor Editor Position: By permission of instructor.
Human Rights Quarterly: Staff Participating students engage in the selection and editing of articles for publication in the University of Cincinnati Human Rights Quarterly. Human Rights Quarterly Staff only.
Human Rights Quarterly: Editor Editor Position: By permission of Instructor. Participating students engage in the selection and editing of articles for publication in the University of Cincinnati Human Rights Quarterly. Human Rights Quarterly Staff only.
Immigra&Nat'l LR: EIC Editor-in-Chief; by permission of Instructor.
Immigra&Nat'lity LR:Staff Participating students engage in selection and preparation of articles for publication in the Review. Students also write notes and comments for publication in the Review.
Immigra&Nat'lity LR:Staff Participating students engage in selection and preparation of articles for publication in the Review. Students also write notes and comments for publication in the Review.
Indigent Defense Clinic Through the Office of the Hamilton County Public Defender, students provide representation to indigent criminal defendants in misdemeanor cases. Each student is closely supervised by a licensed attorney and handles all aspects of the case, from the initial client interview and investigation to motions practice and trial advocacy. During the year-long program, students must commit 15 hours each week to the clinic, including participation in a weekly classroom components.
Indigent Defense Clinic FP Concurrent enrollment required in LITG 7051 as well as the full-year.
Juvenile Law This class examines the status, rights, and obligations of children, parents, and government related to children's issues. It will focus on the areas of dependency, abuse, neglect, and other topics related to child advocacy as time permits. The course will also examine the role of the lawyer in adjudicating cases related to juvenile law.
Criminal Procedure I This introductory course deals with the constitutional aspects of various police practices, focusing primarily on the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments to the US Constitution. The course specifically addresses the right to counsel; arrest, search and seizure; wiretapping, electronic eavesdropping and the use of secret agents; police interrogation and confession; and the scope and administration of the exclusionary rules.
Corporations II This course builds on the core concepts learned in Corporations I and addresses advanced issues in modern corporation law, including the nature of the public corporation, corporate governance issues and the corporate social responsibility movement. It also covers federal and state corporate compliance issues along with the importance of adopting strong internal controls.
Environmental Law I This course surveys the government's role in environmental protection, including the scope and nature of governmental control. Topics covered include pollution control, toxic substances and hazardous waste, as well as conservation measures.
Health Care Law This class explores the financing and regulation of health care, bioethics, the various structures of health care organizations, the physician-patient relationship, professional liability of health care providers, and tort reform for medical injuries.
Int'l Commercial Arbitration International arbitration has increased as a function of world trade. With parties unwilling to accept the risks of litigation in the local courts of their foreign business partners, international arbitration agreements have become the leading mechanism for the resolution of international commercial disputes. This course gives students a basic foundation in the mechanics of international commercial arbitration and an understanding of the tactical choices that frequently confront international arbitration practitioners. In particular, the course will examine systematically, through statutes, rules, national and international cases, and treaties, the establishment, operation, and implementation of awards of international commercial arbitration tribunals; the role of national courts in compelling, facilitating, and enforcing or vacating arbitral awards; and policies currently under consideration for changing arbitral practices.
Deposition Skills This course will introduce taking and defending depositions. Major topics will include an overview of depositions (what depositions are and how they fit into the larger case strategy), preparing for a deposition (creating a deposition outline and exhibits), standard deposition admonitions (and what they actually mean), effective use of questioning (open vs. closed questions and the funnel technique), and form objections. Students will take part in deposition simulations and view videotaped depositions.
Capital Punishment Capital Punishment
Individual Research Project(1) Under the direct supervision of a member of the faculty, upper level students engage in original research and prepare for credit a substantial work product. The research project is selected jointly by the student and faculty member. Customarily, the final product will be a research paper, and, in that case, the paper must be 10-15 pages long. The student must both register for the course and present a completed contract by the last day of the drop/add period. Contracts must be turned in on time or students will be dropped from the class. You are limited to five total credits of individual writing per academic year. Credits cannot be adjusted after the add/drop period.
Individual Research Project(2) Under the direct supervision of a member of the faculty, upper level students engage in original research and prepare for credit a substantial work product. The research project is selected jointly by the student and faculty member. Customarily, the final product will be a research paper, and, in that case, the paper must be 20-30 pages long for two credits. The student must both register for the course and present a completed contract by the last day of the drop/add period. Contracts must be turned in on time or students will be dropped from the class. You are limited to five total credits of individual writing per academic year. Credits cannot be adjusted after the add/drop period.
Individual Research Project(3) Under the direct supervision of a member of the faculty, upper level students engage in original research and prepare for credit a substantial work product. The research project is selected jointly by the student and faculty member. Customarily, the final product will be a research paper, and, in that case, the paper must be 35-50 pages long for three credits. The student must both register for the course and present a completed contract by the last day of the drop/add period. Contracts must be turned in on time or students will be dropped from the class. You are limited to five total credits of individual writing per academic year. Credits cannot be adjusted after the add/drop period.
Technology in Law Practice Technology is changing the practice of law in all fields and venues. This course will provide students with the theoretical and practical background to understand these changes and to positively impact their firm's or organization's responses to such challenges. Areas of special focus include case and client management; document management and electronic discovery; information literacy; presentation technologies; and ethical implications. Readings and guest speakers will address both general technological issues as well as specific legal ramifications. Students will participate through their course projects in creating materials for a field of legal education that is still early in the process of forming.
Legal Extern Class The classroom component of the Legal Extern Program emphasizes practical lawyering skills, law office economics, and ethical issues. In their field placements, legal externs work under the supervision of attorneys in local, state, and federal public agencies, for legal aid and other non-profit organizations, and in some other organizations in the private sector. To apply for an externship, return the completed form with a resume and a transcript to the College of Law Registrar by the due date set for the term.
Legal Extern FP Concurrent enrollment in LITG 7016 is required.
Judicial Externship Class The classroom component of this course covers an analysis of the methods of selecting judges, speech and money-raising aspects of judicial campaigns, the federal confirmation process, and issues of judicial bias and recusal and behavior on and off the bench. The work performed in the judicial extern field placement is essentially the same as that performed by a law clerk to a judge. It usually involves preparing memoranda on cases, reviewing case files, drafting opinions and orders, and attending court and conferences. The precise tasks performed, however, depend upon the type of court and the style of the judge. SPECIAL NOTES: Concurrent enrollment in Judicial Extern Class and Field placement required. See special memo regarding Judicial Extern Program on website. Complete separate Judicial Extern Preference Form and include transcript and resume. Materials must be submitted to the Registrar by designated due date. Students may not enroll concurrently in Extern programs. May only take Judicial Externship once. Usually offered every semester.
Judicial Extern FP Concurrent enrollment in Judicial Extern Class is required.
Mental Health Law I:CvlComtmnt In this class, we will focus on the legal aspects of publicly-financed mental health care and the traditional and current governmental responses to mental disability. This course is open to Weaver Fellows; other interested students should contact the College of Law Registrar.
Bioethics Bioethics explores the development of American law as it relates to ethical and moral issues in the areas of health care and life sciences. Supplementing courses in health law and public health law, and law and biosciences, this course is intended to give students an appreciation of the ways in which the law’s regulatory powers have been used to guide decision-making in medicine and biomedical research, and, in turn, how theories of medical ethics and practice have informed modern legal developments. In this class, we will take up a range of issues including (but not limited to): end of life decisions, allocation of resources such as organs for transplantation, human reproduction, human subjects’ research, and developments in genetics and stem cell research and therapies. Bioethics raises difficult questions about the nature, meaning, and value of life and the importance and appropriate ethical and legal role of health care. Through an in-depth study and writing on these topics, I hope that you will develop and challenge our thinking about these issues. Students will be evaluated based on a final research paper. There are no prerequisites.
Negotiations In this course students learn the "science and art" of negotiation. Students are introduced to significant literature and theory in negotiation and have the opportunity to practice negotiating through a sequenced series of negotiation simulations. This course will involve feedback on recorded negotiation performance; initially ungraded and solely for student benefit. The final grade will be based on a combination of written analysis in the form of analytical journal entries as well as your analysis of recorded negotiation performance.
Trial Practice The development of litigative techniques is stressed through student participation in simulated trial situations. Each aspect of the trial is studied and emphasis is placed upon strategy and fact management.
Employment Based Immig Law Students are introduced to national and international legislation and decisions concerning the entrance and residence in the United States by aliens, including the social, economic and political aspects thereof.
International Trade Law Discusses the current trends in international commercial policies related to the multilateral trading system developed through the World Trade Organization, Free Trade Agreements and Investment Protection Treaties. Regulation of international trade is studied through the analysis of different sectors of the economy. Special interest is given to the relationship of trade policies with sectoral public policies. Additional interest is given to the recent tendencies of protectionist national economic policies and how they affect the international trading system. Topics are developed in class as a result of continuous discussions with students based on previously assigned readings. Classes are practical and case law based. Current trends are also analyzed through statistical data.
Remedies This course covers all forms of ultimate relief in civil actions: damages, restitution, and equitable relief. The first portion deals with the damage remedies in tort, contract, real property, and personal property litigation. The second unit analyzes the alternative remedy of restitution, in law and equity. The course concludes with those cases governing specific relief in equity, specific performance in contract, and injunctions in tort.
Intro to Law & Psychiatry This course introduces the student to the issues arising from the interaction of mentally ill or incapacitated individuals with the American civil and criminal justice system. It also considers the practice and structure of the mental health profession. This class is required for Weaver Fellows.
Advertising Law This class explores copyright, trademark, right of publicity, and other intellectual property issues, as well as defamation and product disparagement issues surrounding the creative world of advertising. Topics will include logos; products and their packaging; the use of images in advertising; celebrity sponsorships; false advertising, comparative advertising; contests and lotteries; internet advertising; government regulation of "unfair" trade practices; children's advertising; and the relationship between First Amendment concerns and commercial speech.
Appellate Practice & Procedure This covers the role and function of appellate courts: preserving issues for appeal; appealability; appeal strategy; the record on appeal; briefs and oral argument; operating procedures of appellate courts; motion practice; extraordinary writs; and related matters. Each student prepares a critique of an actual case pending in an appellate court.
Innocence Project:WrongConv In this course, students examine the various types of evidence that might lead to the wrongful conviction of innocent persons. They will also consider the roles police, prosecutors, and defense lawyers play in the criminal justice system, with an emphasis on discovering how errors can lead to the conviction of the innocent. SPECIAL NOTES: Field Study in the spring semester is required.
Innocence Project FP The Ohio Innocence Project (OIP), a part of the Rosenthal Institute for Justice, harnesses the energy and intellect of students to identify inmates in Ohio prisons who are innocent of the crimes they were convicted of committing. Innocence is often determined by DNA testing, but can include other types of new evidence such as new witnesses, new expert testimony, or evidence of police misconduct. Once an inmate's innocence has been established through investigation, the OIP sends the case back to court and litigates in the hope of obtaining the inmate's freedom. Students have a one-year commitment; this is the third and final component.
Patent Law This course examines the federal statutory system of protection for useful, novel, and non-obvious inventions and those developments that enrich the technological arts. Although not a requisite, students with a science background will find it helpful to them in this course and this field.
Education Law This course examines legal issues encountered at all levels of education. The course will focus on such problems as academic freedom, curriculum control, censorship, mandatory education, church – state issues, faculty and student rights, tort and civil liability of educational institutions, and educational opportunity, including rights of the handicapped.
IP & Comp Law Jrnl Assoc Ed The Intellectual Property and Computer Law Journal is dedicated to furthering knowledge associated with the research and practice of intellectual property law, computer law, and related fields concerning domestic and international media and telecommunications policy. The Journal will be published online. The Registrar will enroll students selected to participate in the necessary class through the registration system.
IP & Comp Law Jrnl Assoc Ed The Intellectual Property and Computer Law Journal is dedicated to furthering knowledge associated with the research and practice of intellectual property law, computer law, and related fields concerning domestic and international media and telecommunications policy. The Journal will be published online. The Registrar will enroll students selected to participate in the necessary class through the registration system.
IP & Computer Law Jrnl EIC Intellectual Property & Computer Law Journal Editor-in-Chief. By permission of supervising faculty/instructor.
IP&CLJ Ed Board Limited to students identified by supervising faculty member.
Information Privacy Law Every business deals with private information of one sort or another. That information, often traversing legal boundaries at the speed of light, might concern medical care, payments, employees, clients, or consumers, and it may implicate different sectoral and jurisdictional rules. Businesses often have to consider state, national, and international laws to figure out what they can and cannot do with the information they possess, or want to possess, or what they need to do and might have to face when they lose it. Those laws come in various forms: torts, contracts, constitutions, statutes, and regulations (with a number of industry and self-regulatory schemes to boot). And they may have originated before information became either electronic or digital, often stem from a particular conception of “privacy,” represent a compromise among competing values, and aren’t always consistent with one another. This course is an introduction to all of that.
Law Review 2L Participating students engage in the selection and editing of articles for publication in the University of Cincinnati Law Review. Some students also write notes and comments for publication in the Review. Students must participate in a competition and be selected to participate. The College of Law Registrar will schedule you in the appropriate course; it is your responsibility to make sure you have room in your schedule to accommodate the addition of this course.
Law Review 3L Participating students engage in the selection and editing of articles for publication in the University of Cincinnati Law Review. Some students also write notes and comments for publication in the Review. Students must participate in a competition and be selected to participate. The College of Law Registrar will schedule you in the appropriate course; it is your responsibility to make sure you have room in your schedule to accommodate the addition of this course.
Law Review Blog Editor The blog has student, professor and practitioner contributors. Knowledge of Bluebook and Texas Law Review Manual for Style and Usage, and ability to coordinate. The job responsibilities of the Blog Editor would include: • Actively solicit and select practitioners for blog posts • Ensure Contributing Members, Guest or Student Editors, and Student Contributors all meet posting requirements ensuring conformance with the Texas Law Review Manual for Style and Usage and that all footnote content conform with the Bluebook • Coordinating promotion and utilization of the blog including monitoring any comments/feedback. In recognition of the responsibilities of the Blog Editor, this position will receive 2 non-classroom credit hours; it would not meet the writing or seminar requirement. This position would only be open to 3L students. The UC Law Review Blog is of great importance to the future of the Law Review. With a dedicated position overseeing the blog, the maintenance and care of the blog can be guaranteed. By Permission Only
Law Review Contributing Editor By permission only.
Law Review Ed/Exec Ed Participating students engage in the selection and editing of articles for publication in the University of Cincinnati Law Review. Students also write notes and comments for publication in the Review.
Moot Court Competition This is the intramural competition for the Moot Court Honor Board open to all 2L students. Students wishing to participate in the competition should enroll in this class.
Moot Court Honor Board Open to 2L students in their Spring Semester; prerequisite for Moot Court Executive Editor. Prereq: To enroll you must: Have taken LITG7017 Moot Court Competition
Mt Ct Sr. Semester For 3L students in both fall and spring semesters.
Mt Ct Rendigs Prob Writer Open to the Rendigs Problem Writer and by permission of instructor only. Prereq: To enroll you must: Have taken LITG7017 Moot Court Competition
Mt Ct Exec Director Open to the Executive Director only.
Patent &Trademark Clinic Class In this course, students will work at the University of Cincinnati College of Law’s Patent and Trademark Clinic (PTC), obtaining “hands on” experience representing local business owners, aspiring entrepreneurs, and inventors in identifying, protecting, and commercializing their intellectual property, focusing on work to be performed in the patent and trademark areas.  Services for individual clients may include completion of patent applications (provisional and non-provisional); completion of federal trademark applications and copyright registrations; analysis and opinions on patent and trademark registrability; analysis and opinions on patent, trademark, and/or copyright infringement; assistance on responding to office actions from the USPTO; preparation, review, and/or negotiation of IP licenses and other related agreements; and general IP advice. The PTC will not represent its clients in litigation/dispute resolution or on foreign applications. PTC students also will learn how a small law office operates, including procedures for client intake, conflict checks, file maintenance, project tracking, timekeeping, scheduling, and client communications. Students will perform all work at the PTC under the close supervision of its directors and volunteer-lawyers with relevant expertise.  Students will be expected to average 8-12 hours per week working on clinic matters, with 3 of those hours spent in the PTC office at the law school: 4:30-6:30 on Thursdays with an additional hour to be scheduled weekly. The PTC will share the offices of the Entrepreneurship and Community Development Clinic. The PTC will represent only clients of limited financial means who cannot afford the services of the private bar and will not represent clients in litigation.
Patent and Trademark FP Patent and Trademark FP
IP Practice 1 The goal of this course is to introduce students to the work new lawyers practicing in the area of intellectual property are likely to encounter in private practice or in the corporate setting. This course will focus on many areas of intellectual property including patents, trademarks, copyrights, and trade secrets and will include discussions and projects related to these IP topics. Some projects might include work on handling of confidential information, joint development issues, and due diligence reviews. This course may also address numerous other practical IP issues such as recognition of your client’s IP rights, understanding how to protect those IP rights, and advising clients with respect to enforcement of IP rights.
Sixth Circuit Clinic In this clinic, students will work on cases for indigent clients whose cases are on appeal to the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, a federal appellate court located in Cincinnati. Under the supervision of experienced attorneys, students will analyze trial records, identify arguments to be used in the appeals process, and write motions and briefs for their clients. This is an excellent opportunity for students to learn about federal courts, criminal law, appellate procedure, and improve writing skills. Students will also have the chance to learn from experienced lawyers, meet members of the federal bar, and meet federal judges. Students will be expected to attend oral arguments at the Sixth Circuit as well as present their own oral arguments in class. Students should be aware that the field placement component of the class will require them to spend approximately 4 hours each week on client work. Interested students should fill out the attached application and return it to the College of Law Registrar, by the due date. The Registrar will register you in the course but it is your responsibility to make sure you have room in your schedule for both components.
Sixth Circuit FP Concurrent enrollment in LITG 7043 is required.
Real Estate Transactions This class will focus on practical, real life situations involved in residential and commercial real estate transactions. The emphasis of the course will be on drafting documents appropriately, in order to avoid disputes. Areas covered will include: Attorney’s and broker’s roles in the transaction; the contract of sale; due diligence during the transaction; title assurance; and financing including mortgage foreclosures and distressed sales.
Trial Pract Competition Team Full-year commitment required. Students will prepare and enter trial competitions in the fall and spring under the supervision of attorney-coaches.
Animal Law This course examines the law as it relates to nonhuman animals, including companion animals, wildlife, livestock, animals used for research, and animals used for entertainment.  Students will read and discuss state and federal case law, statutes, and administrative regulations affecting substantive areas of law including constitutional law, contract, tort, property, criminal law, wills, and trusts.  Students will also read and discuss the history and development of animal law and policy, and will consider current legislative and policy initiatives.
Child Protection Advocacy One of the most intrusive governmental actions is the removal of children from their families. The grounds for removal include abuse and neglect. These decisions are made by juvenile and family courts across the nation, resulting in nearly 500,000 children in the child protection system each year. The parties to a child protection action include county social workers, parents, best interests advocates known as Guardians ad Litem (GAL) and Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA Volunteer), and the children. These parties are represented by attorneys in a variety of roles. This course is designed as an introduction to child protection actions and the roles of attorneys participating in them, and current practitioners.
Child Protection Advocacy FP One of the most intrusive governmental actions is the removal of children from their families. The grounds for removal include abuse and neglect. These decisions are made by juvenile and family courts across the nation, resulting in nearly 500,000 children in the child protection system each year. The parties to a child protection action include county social workers, parents, best interests advocates known as Guardians ad Litem (GAL) and Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA Volunteer), and the children. These parties are represented by attorneys in a variety of roles. This course is designed as an introduction to child protection actions and the roles of attorneys participating in them, and current practitioners.
Law Continuing Full-time Administrative Use Only.
INTRO TO LEGAL PROFESSION This course will explore how law is an important part of all aspects of our society, including our economy, our democracy, and our personal lives. Using current topics in law, such as drones, online privacy issues, and issues of policing, students will explore the broad impact of the law and legal actors on our society. Fundamental concepts will be discussed that include property rights as a bundle of rights and law giving rise to settled expectations so that businesses are willing to make investments in the economy. The course will also explore the role of attorneys in society including how they are trained and licensed in the United States. Types of legal practices will be discussed such as business, criminal, intellectual property, litigation, employment, and other common types of practice areas. Important topics of legal ethics will be discussed. Students will have the opportunity to meet lawyers and law students, along with opportunities to visit places where law is important, which may include courtrooms, prisons, law firms, and businesses.
Courses for Spring 2017
Course Name Course Description
Domestic Violence and Civil Protection Order Clinic As part of collaboration with the Legal Aid Society of Cincinnati, students act as advocates for victims of domestic violence. Advocacy includes interviewing and counseling clients, helping clients in civil protection order cases as well as issues as they relate to family law.
   
Administrative Law Government agencies increasingly regulate the marketplace, health and safety, and provide basic services. This course explores the constitutional powers and limitations on agency action, judicial review of agencies, and the procedures with which agencies must comply in regulating or providing benefits.
Advanced Health Law Lawyers working within the healthcare context face ever changing legal, regulatory, and ethical challenges. This course is designed to provide further understanding of health law concepts beyond those introduced in the basic health law course and to develop strategies and skills for practice in this field.
Advanced Legal Research: Methods & Applications This course builds upon the basic research skills and techniques learned in the required Lawyering I courses. Its problem-solving approach gives students practical research experience that will enhance their understanding of legal literature and legal research principles. Students will learn to assess and respond strategically to legal research problems using available resources in print and digital formats. The focus is on researching United States federal and state law.  
Advanced Topics in Constitutional Law: Children & War This course will explore some of the ways children are affected by war and the violations of human rights law and international humanitarian law implicated. The aim of the course is to stimulate critical thinking about the consequences of war for children and their place in the public war narrative.
Advanced Problems in Constitutional Law: Contemporary Constitutional Challenges This seminar will examine key constitutional challenges that the United States faces in the early 21st century -‚ issues of public concern that have sparked significant debate about the proper role of constitutional values in contemporary American life.
   
Business Associations This course covers major topics in the law of agency, partnerships, limited partnerships, limited liability companies and corporations, as well as selected aspects of the federal securities laws.
Business Basics for Lawyers Virtually all forms of legal practice require a basic understanding of fundamental business concepts. This course is designed to help students gain a basic understanding of accounting and finance principles as well as general business concepts.
Business Tax This course will cover the fundamentals of the federal income tax as it applies to businesses. Its focus will be on the tax treatment of the most common business entities: C corporations, partnerships, and S corporations. This course is intended to provide a basic understanding of these entities'‚ most frequent tax issues for those interested either in a career in tax law or representing business entities more generally.
Civil Procedure II This course continues issues first explored in Civil Procedure I. It opens with joinder of parties in multi-party actions, interpleader, class actions and intervention. Modern discovery procedures, the trial process, and post-trial motions are considered. The course ends with procedures governing appeals, alternative dispute resolution, and the effect of res judicata and collateral estoppels by judgment in prior litigation.
Client Counseling This intensive workshop course focuses on the realities of working with clients, from the initial lawyer-client interview through the challenges of counseling the fully informed client toward wise and ethical decision-making.
Constitutional Law II This required course covers individual rights and freedoms, including the incorporation of the Bill of Rights as against the States, freedom of speech and religion, due process, economic and personal liberties and state action.
Corporate Finance This course teaches concepts and methodologies used by corporations in major financing activities, as well as legal issues that may arise in those activities. Course materials are divided into four parts: equity financing, debt financing, valuation methodologies, and financial derivatives.  
Counterterrorism Law This course will introduce students to the rapidly developing area of counterterrorism law. Areas of coverage include: attacking terrorists abroad, detecting and preventing terrorism, detaining and interrogating terrorist suspects, arresting, prosecuting, and removing terrorists, managing terrorist attacks, and non-criminal sanctions against terrorists and their sponsors.
Criminal Defense: Investigation & Discovery Using the Theory of Defense as the guide by which all else follows, this course will explore the components of an effective defense of the criminally accused, with special consideration being given to the unique problems presented when representing the indigent defendant.  
Criminal Law This course deals with substantive criminal law, although its focus is on the various principles that apply to all crimes rather than on the elements of specific crimes. Homicidal crimes are given separate attention, however. The various defenses, including insanity, are reviewed.
Criminal Procedure I This introductory course deals with the constitutional aspects of various police practices, focusing primarily on the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments to the US Constitution. The course specifically addresses the right to counsel; arrest, search and seizure; wiretapping, electronic eavesdropping and the use of secret agents; police interrogation and confession; and the scope and administration of the exclusionary rules.
Criminal Procedure II This course covers the basic rules for post-arrest criminal litigation. Sources include constitutions, statutes and court rules, ethical codes, performance standards, research data, and appellate decisions interpreting these primary materials. Topics include the right to counsel, charging decisions, pretrial detention, discovery and investigation, plea bargaining, speedy trial and double jeopardy, jury selection, additional trial rights, including compulsory process and confrontation of witnesses, sentencing, and appeal/post-conviction procedures. The goal is clear understanding of the rules, their underlying theories, and their real-world consequences.
Disability Law One in five Americans has a disability, but it was not until 1990 that Congress passed the Americans with Disabilities (ADA), a comprehensive federal statute prohibiting disability discrimination in virtually every aspect of American life. This course introduces students to the ADA and other federal laws protecting the rights of individuals with disabilities. It also focuses on the disability rights movement, the social construction of "disability,"‚ and the increasing appreciation of disability rights as civil rights.
Election Law The goal of this course is to introduce students to the legal underpinnings of today' s democratic politics, the historical struggle over the structure of democratic institutions, and the practical consequences that follow from different institutional arrangements. As time allows, students will examine the history, law, and contemporary legal and policy debates regarding the individual right to vote, the districting and apportionment process (including partisan and racial gerrymandering), and the financing of campaigns and independent expenditures.
Electronic Discovery Electronic discovery plays an important and increasingly high-profile role in modern litigation. This course will provide a comprehensive study of electronic discovery issues, blending an in-depth analysis of legal principles with the study of their application in practice.
Employment Discrimination This course surveys the major legislative and executive provisions prohibiting various types of discrimination in employment. Discrimination is considered in the context of hiring, promotion, discharge, benefits, conditions, and the like. Consideration is also given to the procedures applicable to employment discrimination cases.
Entrepreneurship & Community Development Clinic In this course, students will staff the Entrepreneurship and Community Development Clinic (ECDC), obtaining "hands on"‚ experience representing local businesses and entrepreneurs on transactional legal issues critical to their success, including assistance and counseling on entity selection and formation, regulatory compliance and licensing, trademark/copyright protection, lease review and negotiation, contract preparation/review/negotiation, tax-exempt applications, and other legal issues confronting small businesses, both for-profit and nonprofit.
Evidence The goal of this course is for students to know and be able to apply (1) the Federal Rules of Evidence governing relevance, unfair prejudice, character evidence, impeachment, hearsay, and opinion testimony; (2) the rules as they intersect with a few constitutional provisions, such as the Sixth Amendment confrontation right; and (3) some housekeeping rules, such as Rules 102- 105, 201, 611, and the Best Evidence rule.
Expert Witness at Trial The course will address the use of expert witnesses in litigation. It is based upon the Supreme Court's seminal decisions in Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, Inc., 509 U.S. 579 (1993), General Electric Co. v. Joiner, 522 U.S. 136 (1997), Kumho Tire Co., Ltd. v. Carmichael, 526 U.S. 137 (1999), as well as Ohio and Kentucky cases adopting the Daubert analysis of expert testimony. The emphasis will be on practical exercises: drafting and conducting examinations based upon expert reports and other expert trial exhibits taken from actual litigation.
Family Law Primary focus is on the relationship between law and the family in the context of the creation, maintenance and restructuring of domestic relations. Special attention is given to the nature of marriage, separation, divorce, dissolution, support, alimony, and child custody.
First Amendment Seminar Directed principally at exploring freedom of speech and freedom of religion, this seminar enables each student to consider both the historical development of and contemporary cases and issues related to the First Amendment. 
Gender and the Law This course examines how gender shapes and informs the law and how legal doctrine affects our understanding of gender. The objectives of the course include the following: (1) to provide several opportunities to write and produce quality short papers on gender-related issues; and (2) to determine how the study of gender and feminist theory can enrich the study of law. The course will introduce a variety of theoretical approaches to the study of gender and will cover such substantive areas as employment, education, and family law.
Government Regulation: Regulatory State The Regulatory State is a course about government. More specifically, it is about the legal rules, principles, and institutions by which the government operates. In popular political discourse, the claim is often made that "there is too much government."‚ Similarly, the opposite claim is also often made that "there ought to be a law."‚ Additionally, we all experience the fact that our daily lives are heavily affected by government rules and regulations from speed limits to securities regulations and from local zoning to national and international energy laws. In this way, then, government regulation may well seem ubiquitous.

Health Care Law This class explores the financing and regulation of health care, bioethics, the various structures of health care organizations, the physician-patient relationship, professional liability of health care providers, and tort reform for medical injuries.
Indigent Defense Clinic Through the Office of the Hamilton County Public Defender, students provide representation to indigent criminal defendants in misdemeanor cases. Each student is closely supervised by a licensed attorney and handles all aspects of the case, from the initial client interview and investigation to motions practice and trial advocacy.  
Individual Research Projects Under the direct supervision of a member of the faculty, upper-level students engage in original research and prepare for credit a substantial written work product. The research project is selected jointly by the student and faculty member. Customarily, the final product will be a research paper, and, in that case, the paper must be 10-15 pages long for one credit, 20-30 pages long for two credits, and 35-50 pages long for three credits.
Information Privacy Law Every business deals with private information of one sort or another. That information, often traversing legal boundaries at the speed of light, might concern medical care, payments, employees, clients, or consumers, and it may implicate different sectoral and jurisdictional rules. Businesses often have to consider state, national, and international laws to figure out what they can and cannot do with the information they possess, or want to possess, or what they need to do and might have to face when they lose it. Those laws come in various forms: torts, contracts, constitutions, statutes, and regulations (with a number of industry and self- regulatory schemes to boot).
International Business Transactions This course is intended to prepare students to represent clients in a variety of business transactions that contain international elements. The emphasis is on the formation and enforcement of agreements between private commercial parties and on the anticipation and recognition of issues that are peculiar to, or are especially prevalent in, international business.
International Intellectual Property This advanced doctrinal course will consider the global aspects of protecting all the human creations that fall under the general rubric of intellectual property, from creative or expressive works, to useful inventions, to corporate brands and confidential information. The perspective is both international and comparative. That is, we will study both the internal‚ intellectual property systems of foreign nations as well as the external‚ regime that governs interactions between nations in the intellectual property domain.
International Tax The purpose of this course is to examine the U.S. taxation of transactions undertaken by foreign individuals or entities in the United States as well as the U.S. taxation of transactions undertaken by U.S. individuals or entities abroad. The former, foreign individuals or entities coming here, are referred to as inbound transactions, and the latter, U.S. individuals or entities going abroad, are referred to as outbound transactions. The focus of the course is on how the U.S. tax system deals with the consequences of both inbound and outbound transactions.
Judicial Externship The class component of the Judicial Extern Program covers writing for judges and proper conduct for judges and judicial clerks. The work performed in the judicial extern field placement is similar to that performed by a law clerk to a judge. It usually involves preparing memoranda on cases, reviewing case files, drafting opinions and orders, and attending court and conferences. The precise tasks performed, however, depend upon the type of court and the style of the judge. 
Jurisprudence: Achieving Democracy - The Future of Progressive Regulation With the change of presidential administrations, together with all of the political conversation attending it, it is a good time to consider the nature of our polity and the values obtained. This course will include discussion of "Achieving Democracy: The Future of Progressive Regulation."
Juvenile Law This course covers the juvenile justice system and related juvenile issues. This course explores the juvenile justice system with a focus on juvenile delinquency and child-welfare related matters. The course will examine the structure of the juvenile justice system and the agencies which interact with the system.
Labor Law This course examines labor unions and labor-management relations from both a legal and a social perspective and will utilize traditional legal materials such as statutes, regulations and judicial opinions, which will be complemented by social research such as theoretical perspectives and empirical studies from the social sciences.
Land Use Planning: How the Constitution & Local Government Shape the City Around You Critical consideration and discussion of the federal, state, and regulatory framework applicable to land use controls, including the origins and contemporary application of law and policies concerning land use planning, zoning, historic preservation, eminent domain, transportation-oriented development, inclusionary housing, environmental review, the interaction of those laws with private property rights, and the legislative and administrative settings within which land use disputes are fought.
   
Legal Analys and Drafting: the Bar Exam This course serves the dual purpose of equipping students to succeed on the written portions of bar examinations and preparing for legal practice by developing and honing skills relevant to legal analysis, professional and effective written communication, principled advocacy, and management of legal work.
Introduction to Legal Drafting This class provides a comprehensive introduction to drafting legal documents in the transactional context, with a heavy emphasis on contracts and internal corporate documents. Students will learn the basic concepts that guide contract drafting and how mastery of these concepts aid in managing risk in legal transactions.
Introduction to Legal Drafting for LLM Students This class provides a comprehensive introduction to drafting legal documents in the transactional context, with a heavy emphasis on contracts and internal corporate documents. LLM students will learn the basic concepts that guide contract drafting and how mastery of these concepts aid in managing risk in legal transactions.
Legal Ethics In this course, students consider the lawyer-client relationship in the context of realistic scenarios, evaluating the complex choices an ethical lawyer must make to establish an effective lawyer-client relationship. Following an examination of the ABA Model Rules and the Ohio Rules of Professional Conduct, students consider the ethical components of the lawyer-client relationship, with an emphasis on competency, confidentiality, and conflicts of interest. The course also includes substantial instruction in the history, goals, structure, values, and responsibilities of the legal profession and its members.
Legal Externship The classroom component of the Legal Extern Program emphasizes practical lawyering skills, law office economics, and ethical issues. In their field placements, legal externs work under the supervision of attorneys in local, state, and federal public agencies, for legal aid and other non- profit organizations, and in businesses and other organizations in the private sector. 
Legal Regulation of Human Subject Research This course considers the legal regulation of an activity that is at the core of every university and academic medical center, federally funded research, as well as the human subject research conducted by drug, biotechnology, and medical device companies. Both the entities conducting the research and the entities funding it hire young lawyers to make sure that they are acting in compliance about regulations that controls every aspect of the research,‚ from protection of human subjects, to reporting of results, to financial record keeping.
Legislation & Statutory Interpretation This course explores the enactment of statutes by federal and state legislators and the interpretation given by the courts and administrative agencies to such legislative enactments. The course will focus on various procedural, constitutional, and jurisprudential issues relating to the legislative and electoral processes embodied in our constitutional order, and to the methods of statutory interpretation employed by our courts and administrative agencies.
Mental Health Law II This course will focus on the private sector health care issues that arise frequently in mental health law. Issues to be covered include: guardianship, psychiatric malpractice and informed consent, mental health law confidentiality and privilege, duties to warn and other duties to third parties, the right to refuse treatment, the right to treatment and the influence of the ADA, the admissibility of mental health professional expert testimony, brief coverage of ERISA and the right to die.
Negotiations In this course students learn the "science and art" of negotiation. Students are introduced to significant literature and theory in negotiation and have the opportunity to practice negotiating through a sequenced series of negotiations simulations.
Practical Application of Business Tax Concepts This course will provide students with an overview of practical tax concepts for business attorneys. This course focuses on translating tax law into tax filings, the choices required to complete filings, and the process of these filings. In this process, students will be introduced to federal, state, local, and international tax practices. Some topics that might be covered include tax compliance, state and local taxes, transactional taxes, and practice and procedure.
Sales This course deals primarily with contracts for the sale of goods under Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code. In it, we will master code‚ reading and basic Article 2 doctrines. Students also examine how the law of the sale of goods differs from the common law of contracts, particularly with respect to the relevant law of warranties, performance, risk of loss, and remedies. Students explore the reasons, both practical and theoretical, for the substantive differences between Article 2 and common law contracts. Finally, the course examines, to varying degrees, the related law of leases of goods (under Article 2A of the UCC) and contracts for the international sale of goods (under the Convention of Contracts for the International Sale of Goods or CISG).
Sixth Circuit Clinic In this clinic, students will work on cases for indigent clients whose cases are on appeal to the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, a federal appellate court located in Cincinnati. Under the supervision of experienced attorneys, students will analyze trial records, identify arguments to be used in the appeals process, and write motions and briefs for their clients.
Introduction to Sports Law This course is designed to introduce students to the substantive and practical aspects of Sports Law. Students will be exposed to a review of current and selected past case law, a review and interpretation of federal and state legislation, as well as an interpretation of NCAA Bylaws and Constitutional provisions.
State and Local Tax This course provides an overview of the basic principles of state and local taxation. In this course, students will study the federal limitations on state and local taxation including U.S. Constitutional restraints imposed by the Due Process and Commerce Clauses and federal statutory preemptions. In addition, students will study the fundamental principles of the most common state taxes with a focus on corporate net income and sales and use taxes. This course will also address the impact of state and local taxes on multistate businesses, including commerce businesses. Finally, this course will briefly cover general state tax procedures.
   
Trail Practice: Competition Team Students prepare for and participate in Trial Practice Competition Team events.
Trusts & Future Interests This course covers the creation and operation of trusts and the rights and obligations associated with them. It includes the kinds of trusts available, fiduciary duties in the administration of trusts, the law of future interests, and related topics. Related tax issues are not raised or discussed.
Venture Capital and Private Equity This course introduces students to the various legal and business considerations involved in venture capital and private equity transactions.
Vis International Commercial Arbitration Moot Team The Vis Competition has two components. The first component is the researching and writing of two 30 to 35 page memoranda, the first supporting the position of a hypothetical international arbitration claimant and the second supporting the position of the respondent. (This component is expected to involve about 45 hours of work beginning in October and running through the end of January when the respondent memorandum is due.) The second component will include supervising and editing the memoranda plus traveling and participating in the week-long oral competition in either Vienna or Hong Kong.
Witness Preparation Through role play and other means, this course will teach techniques that trial counsel use to prepare themselves and their witnesses for testimony that is truthful, engaging, trustworthy, and persuasive. Students will learn how to showcase witness testimony, reduce risks of unexpected or damaging testimony, gain witness confidence, explain the witness' role, uncover information, lay foundations for admitting exhibits, and deal with cross examinations, etc.
Courses for Fall 2017
Course Name Course Description
Individual Research Project(1) Under the direct supervision of a member of the faculty, upper level students engage in original research and prepare for credit a substantial work product. The research project is selected jointly by the student and faculty member. Customarily, the final product will be a research paper, and, in that case, the paper must be 10-15 pages long. The student must both register for the course and present a completed contract by the last day of the drop/add period. Contracts must be turned in on time or students will be dropped from the class. You are limited to five total credits of individual writing per academic year. Credits cannot be adjusted after the add/drop period.
Individual Research Project(2) Under the direct supervision of a member of the faculty, upper level students engage in original research and prepare for credit a substantial work product. The research project is selected jointly by the student and faculty member. Customarily, the final product will be a research paper, and, in that case, the paper must be 20-30 pages long for two credits. The student must both register for the course and present a completed contract by the last day of the drop/add period. Contracts must be turned in on time or students will be dropped from the class. You are limited to five total credits of individual writing per academic year. Credits cannot be adjusted after the add/drop period.
Individual Research Project(3) Under the direct supervision of a member of the faculty, upper level students engage in original research and prepare for credit a substantial work product. The research project is selected jointly by the student and faculty member. Customarily, the final product will be a research paper, and, in that case, the paper must be 35-50 pages long for three credits. The student must both register for the course and present a completed contract by the last day of the drop/add period. Contracts must be turned in on time or students will be dropped from the class. You are limited to five total credits of individual writing per academic year. Credits cannot be adjusted after the add/drop period.
Civil Procedure I This course covers various aspects of civil litigation from the filing of a complaint up to the discovery process. Jurisdiction over the person, venue, and federal subject matter jurisdiction are explored. Coverage is also given to the decision in Erie RR v. Tompkins and its progeny, concerning the applicability of state law in federal courts. The remainder of the course is devoted to service of process, joinder of parties, counterclaims and amendments.
Constitutional Law I This is an introductory course covering judicial review, federalism, separation of powers, and equal protection.
Constitutional Law I This is an introductory course covering judicial review, federalism, separation of powers, and equal protection.
Constitutional Law I This is an introductory course covering judicial review, federalism, separation of powers, and equal protection.
Civil Procedure I This course covers various aspects of civil litigation from the filing of a complaint up to the discovery process. Jurisdiction over the person, venue, and federal subject matter jurisdiction are explored. Coverage is also given to the decision in Erie RR v. Tompkins and its progeny, concerning the applicability of state law in federal courts. The remainder of the course is devoted to service of process, joinder of parties, counterclaims and amendments.
Federal Courts This course addresses issues of federalism and separation of powers raised by statutes and doctrines which establish and limit federal court jurisdiction. Among the matters addressed are standing, legislative courts, congressional power over federal jurisdiction, the Eleventh Amendment, and the abstention doctrines. Also considered are the role state courts play in the formation and application of doctrines.
US Legal System (LLM) US Legal System (LLM)
2L DV&CP Clinic FP 2L Domestic Violence & Civil Protection Order Field Placement. You must also enroll concurrently in the 2L DV&CPO Class (IRTS 7039).
2L DV&CP Clinic As part of collaboration with the Legal Aid Society of Cincinnati, students act as advocates for victims of domestic violence. Second-year students, who cannot be licensed as legal interns in Ohio, participate in interviewing, case preparation, and other aspects of clinic work. Students might participate as domestic violence advocates in other ways as well. For example, students conducted research and assisted in writing an amicus brief filed with the United States Supreme Court in Abbott v. Abbott, involving custody rights. In addition, when the YWCA shelter was threatened with loss of funding, two clinic students testified before the Cincinnati City Council, which voted to restore funding.
Human Rights Quarterly: Staff Participating students engage in the selection and editing of articles for publication in the University of Cincinnati Human Rights Quarterly. Human Rights Quarterly Staff only.
Human Rights Quarterly: Editor Editor Position: By permission of Instructor. Participating students engage in the selection and editing of articles for publication in the University of Cincinnati Human Rights Quarterly. Human Rights Quarterly Staff only.
Innocence Project:WrongConv In this course, students examine the various types of evidence that might lead to the wrongful conviction of innocent persons. They will also consider the roles police, prosecutors, and defense lawyers play in the criminal justice system, with an emphasis on discovering how errors can lead to the conviction of the innocent. SPECIAL NOTES: Field Study in the spring semester is required.
Freedom Center Journal:Staff The Freedom Center Journal of Law and History engages its readership on issues historically driving African-American intellectual thought while challenging its student membership to fully develop their individual talents to compete on terms of academic equality in an international society governed by law and legal institutions.
Freedom Center Journal:Staff The Freedom Center Journal of Law and History engages its readership on issues historically driving African-American intellectual thought while challenging its student membership to fully develop their individual talents to compete on terms of academic equality in an international society governed by law and legal institutions.
Freedom Center Journal Editor Editor Position: By permission of instructor.
Immigra&Nat'lity LR:Staff Participating students engage in selection and preparation of articles for publication in the Review. Students also write notes and comments for publication in the Review.
Immigra&Nat'lity LR:Staff Participating students engage in selection and preparation of articles for publication in the Review. Students also write notes and comments for publication in the Review.
Immigra&Nat'l LR: EIC Editor-in-Chief; by permission of Instructor.
Law Continuing Full-time Administrative Use Only.
Judicial Extern The classroom component of this course covers an analysis of the methods of selecting judges, speech and money-raising aspects of judicial campaigns, the federal confirmation process, and issues of judicial bias and recusal and behavior on and off the bench. The work performed in the judicial extern field placement is essentially the same as that performed by a law clerk to a judge. It usually involves preparing memoranda on cases, reviewing case files, drafting opinions and orders, and attending court and conferences. The precise tasks performed, however, depend upon the type of court and the style of the judge. SPECIAL NOTES: Concurrent enrollment in Judicial Extern Class and Field placement required. See special memo regarding Judicial Extern Program on website. Complete separate Judicial Extern Preference Form and include transcript and resume. Materials must be submitted to the Registrar by designated due date. Students may not enroll concurrently in Extern programs. May only take Judicial Externship once. Usually offered every semester.
Law Review 2L Participating students engage in the selection and editing of articles for publication in the University of Cincinnati Law Review. Some students also write notes and comments for publication in the Review. Students must participate in a competition and be selected to participate. The College of Law Registrar will schedule you in the appropriate course; it is your responsibility to make sure you have room in your schedule to accommodate the addition of this course.
Law Review 3L Participating students engage in the selection and editing of articles for publication in the University of Cincinnati Law Review. Some students also write notes and comments for publication in the Review. Students must participate in a competition and be selected to participate. The College of Law Registrar will schedule you in the appropriate course; it is your responsibility to make sure you have room in your schedule to accommodate the addition of this course.
Law Review Ed/Exec Ed Participating students engage in the selection and editing of articles for publication in the University of Cincinnati Law Review. Students also write notes and comments for publication in the Review.
Legal Extern The classroom component of the Legal Extern Program emphasizes practical lawyering skills, law office economics, and ethical issues. In their field placements, legal externs work under the supervision of attorneys in local, state, and federal public agencies, for legal aid and other non-profit organizations, and in some other organizations in the private sector. To apply for an externship, return the completed form with a resume and a transcript to the College of Law Registrar by the due date set for the term.
Moot Court Competition This is the intramural competition for the Moot Court Honor Board open to all 2L students. Students wishing to participate in the competition should enroll in this class.
Moot Court Honor Board Open to 2L students in their Spring Semester; prerequisite for Moot Court Executive Editor. Prereq: To enroll you must: Have taken LITG7017 Moot Court Competition
Mt Ct Sr. Semester For 3L students in both fall and spring semesters.
Mt Ct Exec Director Open to the Executive Director only.
Judicial Extern FP Concurrent enrollment in Judicial Extern Class is required.
Legal Extern FP Concurrent enrollment in LITG 7016 is required.
IP & Computer Law Jrnl The Intellectual Property and Computer Law Journal is dedicated to furthering knowledge associated with the research and practice of intellectual property law, computer law, and related fields concerning domestic and international media and telecommunications policy. The Journal will be published online. The Registrar will enroll students selected to participate in the necessary class through the registration system.
IP & Computer Law Jrnl The Intellectual Property and Computer Law Journal is dedicated to furthering knowledge associated with the research and practice of intellectual property law, computer law, and related fields concerning domestic and international media and telecommunications policy. The Journal will be published online. The Registrar will enroll students selected to participate in the necessary class through the registration system.
Mt Ct Rendigs Prob Writer Open to the Rendigs Problem Writer and by permission of instructor only. Prereq: To enroll you must: Have taken LITG7017 Moot Court Competition
Law Review Contributing Editor By permission only.
Indigent Defense Clinic Through the Office of the Hamilton County Public Defender, students provide representation to indigent criminal defendants in misdemeanor cases. Each student is closely supervised by a licensed attorney and handles all aspects of the case, from the initial client interview and investigation to motions practice and trial advocacy. During the year-long program, students must commit 15 hours each week to the clinic, including participation in a weekly classroom components.
Indigent Defense Clinic FP Concurrent enrollment required in LITG 7051 as well as the full-year.
TP Team: Comp Prep Full-year commitment required. Students will prepare and enter trial competitions in the fall and spring under the supervision of attorney-coaches.
IP & Computer Law Jrnl EIC Intellectual Property & Computer Law Journal Editor-in-Chief. By permission of supervising faculty/instructor.
IP&CLJ Ed Limited to students identified by supervising faculty member.
Law Review Blog Editor The blog has student, professor and practitioner contributors. Knowledge of Bluebook and Texas Law Review Manual for Style and Usage, and ability to coordinate. The job responsibilities of the Blog Editor would include: â ¢ Actively solicit and select practitioners for blog posts â ¢ Ensure Contributing Members, Guest or Student Editors, and Student Contributors all meet posting requirements ensuring conformance with the Texas Law Review Manual for Style and Usage and that all footnote content conform with the Bluebook â ¢ Coordinating promotion and utilization of the blog including monitoring any comments/feedback. In recognition of the responsibilities of the Blog Editor, this position will receive 2 non-classroom credit hours; it would not meet the writing or seminar requirement. This position would only be open to 3L students. The UC Law Review Blog is of great importance to the future of the Law Review. With a dedicated position overseeing the blog, the maintenance and care of the blog can be guaranteed. By Permission Only
Public Int Honrs Fellow Public Interest Honors Fellowship Companion Class: This course must be taken simultaneously with the Public Interest Honors Fellowship, and it must be taken both semesters during the academic year. The class component consists of a two-day orientation blast class, subject matter specific instruction in domestic relations and estate planning issues, instruction and simulations in issues pertaining to underserved clients, and guest lectures from volunteer attorneys and court personnel. Students must complete specified written assignments and meet individually with the course instructor. Public Interest Honors Fellowship: Public Interest Honors Fellowships are open only to third year law students eligible to obtain a limited license in Ohio and require a commitment for the entire academic year. Selected students will obtain advanced practical experience (under the supervision of practicing attorneys) by representing selected underserved clients in need of domestic relations and/or estate planning services. The PIHF will interview clients, draft appropriate documents, review and execute those documents with the clients, and appear in court where necessary under the supervision of six different practicing attorneys who will rotate among the students to ensure that each student benefits from the perspective and wisdom of multiple attorneys. To apply for an externship, you need to send resume and letter of interest by July 1st to supervising faculty member.
Public Int Honors FP This course must be taken simultaneously with the Public Interest Honors Fellowship, and it must be taken both semesters during the academic year.
Advertising Law This class explores copyright, trademark, right of publicity, and other intellectual property issues, as well as defamation and product disparagement issues surrounding the creative world of advertising. Topics will include logos; products and their packaging; the use of images in advertising; celebrity sponsorships; false advertising, comparative advertising; contests and lotteries; internet advertising; government regulation of "unfair" trade practices; children's advertising; and the relationship between First Amendment concerns and commercial speech.
Appellate Practice & Procedure This covers the role and function of appellate courts: preserving issues for appeal; appealability; appeal strategy; the record on appeal; briefs and oral argument; operating procedures of appellate courts; motion practice; extraordinary writs; and related matters. Each student prepares a critique of an actual case pending in an appellate court.
Business Associations Business Associations. This course covers major topics in the law of agency, partnerships, limited partnerships, limited liability companies and corporations, as well selected aspects of the federal securities laws. This course will replace both Corporations I and Agency, Partnerships, and Unincorporated Associations. Any student who has taken Corporations I in the past may not take Business Associations. If you have taken Agency, Partnerships, and Unincorporated Associations in the past, you may take Business Associations.
Business Basics Virtually all forms of legal practice require a basic understanding of fundamental business concepts. This course is designed to help students gain a basic understanding of accounting and finance principles as well as general business concepts. We will cover topics such as reading financial statements, understanding cash flow, accounting requirements, and investment principles. Students with an MBA, joint JD/MBA, and undergraduate finance or accounting majors are ineligible for the course
Client Counseling In this course, students consider the lawyer-client relationship in the context of realistic scenarios, examining the basic strategies and skills a lawyer must master in the lawyer-client relationship. Students will practice and demonstrate the skills of effective client communication and practice management. The instruction and simulations will be set in the business transaction context.
Client Counseling In this course, students consider the lawyer-client relationship in the context of realistic scenarios, examining the basic strategies and skills a lawyer must master in the lawyer-client relationship. Students will practice and demonstrate the skills of effective client communication and practice management. The instruction and simulations will be set in the business transaction context.
Computer Crime Law Computer Crime Law
Contracts This course covers basic concepts and doctrines in contract law, including the legal grounds for enforcement of promises, the role of consent in contract formation, contract remedies, and interpretation. Attention is given to both the common law of contracts and to Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code.
Contracts This course covers basic concepts and doctrines in contract law, including the legal grounds for enforcement of promises, the role of consent in contract formation, contract remedies, and interpretation. Attention is given to both the common law of contracts and to Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code.
Contracts This course covers basic concepts and doctrines in contract law, including the legal grounds for enforcement of promises, the role of consent in contract formation, contract remedies, and interpretation. Attention is given to both the common law of contracts and to Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code.
Computer & Internet Law This course tackles the legal issues surrounding computer technology, including the protectibility of computer software; the misappropriation of computer technology; software licenses, support, distribution, and development agreements; ownership of online "content"; privacy in a computer age; and liability for tortious acts and computer crimes.
Corporate Finance This course examines the legal rules governing financial transactions within a corporation and between the corporation and its shareholders. The course will also cover financing the corporation and organic changes, including mergers, consolidation, recapitalizations, and charter amendments. Prerequisite: Corporations I.
Criminal Procedure I This introductory course deals with the constitutional aspects of various police practices, focusing primarily on the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments to the US Constitution. The course specifically addresses the right to counsel; arrest, search and seizure; wiretapping, electronic eavesdropping and the use of secret agents; police interrogation and confession; and the scope and administration of the exclusionary rules.
Crimmigration This course will focus on the historical and current relationship between criminal and immigration law. The class will look at the intersection both in the criminal justice system as well as the immigration court system. It will proceed in two parts. First, it will focus on procedural and substantive law. The goal during this part of the course is for students to gain a practical knowledge to take a non-citizen defendant from his arrest in the criminal system through his immigration proceeding with the ability to understand the consequences of the criminal conviction to his immigration status. Therefore, this part will focus on specific grounds of deportation and inadmissibility related to criminal conduct; analyzing the Immigration and Nationality Act, criminal law, and pertinent case law. This part will include topics such as mandatory detention, aggravated felonies, divisible statutes, crimes of moral turpitude, and Sixth Amendment right to counsel. Second, it will focus on policy. The course will discuss current federal, state and local governmental immigration policies; including immigration raids, cooperation between local law enforcement and the Department of Homeland Security as well as and local ordinances aimed at businesses and employers. Policy discussions will include issues of race, national origin, and ethnicity and its relationship, if any, to the increased use of the criminal justice system to enforce immigration law on national security and public safety grounds. This section will address topics including Secure Communities, 287(g), Operation Streamline and state and local immigration legislation such as SB 1070. The course may include class discussion, lectures, Customs and Border Patrol operations tour at CVG, and outside speakers.
Education Law This course examines legal issues encountered at all levels of education. The course will focus on such problems as academic freedom, curriculum control, censorship, mandatory education, church â state issues, faculty and student rights, tort and civil liability of educational institutions, and educational opportunity, including rights of the handicapped.
Employment Discrimination This course surveys the major legislative and executive provisions prohibiting various types of discrimination in employment. Discrimination is considered in the context of hiring, promotion, discharge, benefits, conditions, and the like. Consideration is also given to the procedures applicable to employment discrimination cases.
Entrepren&CommDev FP Entrepreneurship & Community Development Clinic Field Placement. Students will also be concurrently enrolled in BCL7038.
Entrepren&CommDev Clinic Open to 3Lâ s only. Enrollment is limited to 8-10 students selected by the instructor. No later than the first day of class, students must have a â legal intern certificateâ from the Office of Bar Admissions of the Supreme Court of Ohio. In this course, students will staff the Entrepreneurship and Community Development Clinic (ECDC), obtaining â hands onâ experience representing local businesses and entrepreneurs on transactional legal issues critical to their success, including assistance and counseling on entity selection and formation; regulatory compliance and licensing; trademark/copyright protection; lease review and negotiation; contract preparation/review/negotiation; tax - exempt applications; and other legal issues confronting small businesses, both for-profit and nonprofit. Students also will learn how a small law office operates, including procedures for client intake, file maintenance, project tracking, timekeeping, and scheduling. In addition to attending the weekly class, students will be expected to spend approximately10-12 hours per week on their clinic work, with a minimum of 4 of those hours spent working in the clinic offices, located at the law school and the Hamilton County Business Center. The ECDC will represent primarily clients of limited financial means who cannot afford the services of the private bar and will not represent clients in litigation
Environmental Law I This course surveys the government's role in environmental protection, including the scope and nature of governmental control. Topics covered include pollution control, toxic substances and hazardous waste, as well as conservation measures.
Evidence The goal of this course is for students to know and be able to apply (1) the Federal Rules of Evidence governing relevance, unfair prejudice, character evidence, impeachment, hearsay, and opinion testimony; (2) the rules as they intersect with a few constitutional provisions, such as the Sixth Amendment confrontation right; and (3) some housekeeping rules, such as Rules 102-105, 201, 611, and the Best Evidence rule.
Federal Income Tax This course is structured around the two dominant themes of the taxation of individuals under the Internal Revenue Code: what is income, and what is deductible; and when must the taxpayer recognize income, and when can the taxpayer deduct a particular expense. Also the course examines miscellaneous topics such as capital gains and losses, identifying the proper taxpayer, and others.
Human Rights Seminar One of the strategies for the advancement of human rights is to have a city commit to becoming â A Human Rights City.â This is a research seminar where each member will undertake an assigned topic. We will want to explore whether this has been an effective strategy, as opposed to window dressing, both in other countries, and within the United States. One of the arguments that has been an obstacle to the United States ratification of human rights treaties is that under our federal system, the contents of much of the human rights treaties deals with matters allocated to states rather than the national government. While it is clear that this â federalismâ argument was employed by many who feared that the international human rights commitments would undermine racial segregation, it is accurate that the human rights treaties were different in kind in that they largely focused on obligations to change law within the United States, and yes that a good deal of that law would be at the state level. It is also true that under the Constitution the President & the U.S. Senate are given the responsibility for ratifying treaties, and States have not been brought into the process. The Seminar will explore whether through the portal of the â Cityâ we can take up the challenge of complying with international human rights obligations. We will tackle the hard questions in our exploration of a strategy to create more just communities.
Intro to Intellectual Property This broadest and most basic course gives roughly equal time to the three primary federal doctrines in the area, copyright, trademark, and patent, and gives students a brief introduction to related state law doctrines such as rights of publicity and trade secrets. This course provides students with the basics of each doctrine as well as an understanding of the ways in which they interact with each other.
Intro to Law & Psychiatry This course introduces the student to the issues arising from the interaction of mentally ill or incapacitated individuals with the American civil and criminal justice system. It also considers the practice and structure of the mental health profession. This class is required for Weaver Fellows.
Legal Drafting This class provides a comprehensive introduction to drafting legal documents in the transactional context, with a heavy emphasis on contracts and internal documents. Students will learn the basic concepts that guide contract drafting and how mastery of these concepts aid in managing risk in legal transactions. Students will complete a number of short drafting exercises and two (possibly three) graded drafting assignments.
Lawyering I: LR&W This course covers skills basic to competent legal research and writing. The students write objective memoranda of law based on hypothetical problems composed by the instructors. The course emphasizes issue recognition, case and statutory interpretation, legal analysis, and the use of plain English.
Lawyering I: LR&W This course covers skills basic to competent legal research and writing. The students write objective memoranda of law based on hypothetical problems composed by the instructors. The course emphasizes issue recognition, case and statutory interpretation, legal analysis, and the use of plain English.
Lawyering I: LR&W This course covers skills basic to competent legal research and writing. The students write objective memoranda of law based on hypothetical problems composed by the instructors. The course emphasizes issue recognition, case and statutory interpretation, legal analysis, and the use of plain English.
Lawyering I: LR&W This course covers skills basic to competent legal research and writing. The students write objective memoranda of law based on hypothetical problems composed by the instructors. The course emphasizes issue recognition, case and statutory interpretation, legal analysis, and the use of plain English.
Lawyering I: LR&W This course covers skills basic to competent legal research and writing. The students write objective memoranda of law based on hypothetical problems composed by the instructors. The course emphasizes issue recognition, case and statutory interpretation, legal analysis, and the use of plain English.
Legal Ethics In this course students consider the lawyer-client relationship in the context of realistic scenarios, evaluating the complete choices an ethical lawyer must make to establish an effective lawyer-client relationship. Following an examination of the ABA Model Rules and the Ohio Rules of Professional Conduct, students consider the ethical components of the lawyer-client relationship, with an emphasis on competency, confidentiality, and conflicts of interest. The course also includes substantial instruction in the history, goals, structure, values, and responsibilities of the legal profession and its members.
Legal Ethics In this course students consider the lawyer-client relationship in the context of realistic scenarios, evaluating the complete choices an ethical lawyer must make to establish an effective lawyer-client relationship. Following an examination of the ABA Model Rules and the Ohio Rules of Professional Conduct, students consider the ethical components of the lawyer-client relationship, with an emphasis on competency, confidentiality, and conflicts of interest. The course also includes substantial instruction in the history, goals, structure, values, and responsibilities of the legal profession and its members.
LR&W for LLMs Legal Research & Writing for LLM Students
Media Law This seminar will explore current issues in the law as it relates to media. Students will examine such topics as libel, discovery of editorial materials and privileges, privacy and news-gathering torts, and access to information, including issues arising under the Freedom of Information Act. Throughout the course, hypothetical "problems" will be used to illustrate the points being discussed.
Mental Health Law I:CvlComtmnt In this class, we will focus on the legal aspects of publicly-financed mental health care and the traditional and current governmental responses to mental disability. This course is open to Weaver Fellows; other interested students should contact the College of Law Registrar.
Negotiations In this course students learn the "science and art" of negotiation. Students are introduced to significant literature and theory in negotiation and have the opportunity to practice negotiating through a sequenced series of negotiation simulations. This course will involve feedback on recorded negotiation performance; initially ungraded and solely for student benefit. The final grade will be based on a combination of written analysis in the form of analytical journal entries as well as your analysis of recorded negotiation performance.
Patent and Trademark Clinic In this course, students will work at the University of Cincinnati College of Lawâ s Patent and Trademark Clinic (PTC), obtaining â hands onâ experience representing local business owners, aspiring entrepreneurs, and inventors in identifying, protecting, and commercializing their intellectual property, focusing on work to be performed in the patent and trademark areas. Services will include completion of patent applications (provisional and non-provisional); completion of federal trademark applications and copyright registrations; analysis and opinions on patent and trademark registrability; analysis and opinions on patent, trademark, and/or copyright infringement; assistance on responding to office actions of the USPTO; preparation, review, and/or negotiation of IP licenses; and general IP advice. The PTC will not represent its clients in litigation/dispute resolution or on foreign applications. PTC students also will learn how a small law office operates, including procedures for client intake, conflict checks, file maintenance, project tracking, timekeeping, scheduling, and client communications. Students will perform all work at the PTC under the close supervision of its directors and volunteer-lawyers with relevant expertise. Students will work several hours each week at the PTC office located at the HCDC Business Center. The PTC will represent only clients of limited financial means who cannot afford the services of the private bar and will not represent clients in litigation. Prerequisites: Intro to Intellectual Property or any other introductory IP course that focuses on an area of intellectual property law.
Patent Law This course examines the federal statutory system of protection for useful, novel, and non-obvious inventions and those developments that enrich the technological arts. Although not a requisite, students with a science background will find it helpful to them in this course and this field.
Pretrial Practice This course will focus solely on the litigation skills that an attorney must master in order to steer a civil case from the beginning of a dispute to the point immediately preceding a trial. Topics may include: development of the legal theory/theories in a case (causes of action and defenses); pleadings, including state and federal filing rules, proper parties, service considerations, electronic filing, and waiver of service of summons; development of discovery strategies; discovery, including interrogatories, requests for production of documents, requests for admissions, and motions to compel; depositions, taking and defending; experts, including retainer issues, drafting expert reports, and taking/defending expert depositions; pre-trial motion practice; trial-witness preparation; jury instructions and pre-trial statements; and court-ordered mediation and settlement.
Real Estate Transactions This class will focus on practical, real life situations involved in residential and commercial real estate transactions. The emphasis of the course will be on drafting documents appropriately, in order to avoid disputes. Areas covered will include: Attorneyâ s and brokerâ s roles in the transaction; the contract of sale; due diligence during the transaction; title assurance; and financing including mortgage foreclosures and distressed sales.
Remedies This course covers all forms of ultimate relief in civil actions: damages, restitution, and equitable relief. The first portion deals with the damage remedies in tort, contract, real property, and personal property litigation. The second unit analyzes the alternative remedy of restitution, in law and equity. The course concludes with those cases governing specific relief in equity, specific performance in contract, and injunctions in tort.
Secured Transactions This course focuses on laws governing secured transactions, specifically as set forth in Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code. The topics addressed include the creation and perfection of security interests in personal property, priorities and remedies upon default in these secured transactions, and the interactions of the laws governing secured transactions with the Bankruptcy Code.
Technology in the Law Practice Technology is changing the practice of law in all fields and venues. This course will provide students with the theoretical and practical background to understand these changes and to positively impact their firm's or organization's responses to such challenges. Areas of special focus include case and client management; document management and electronic discovery; information literacy; presentation technologies; and ethical implications. Readings and guest speakers will address both general technological issues as well as specific legal ramifications. Students will participate through their course projects in creating materials for a field of legal education that is still early in the process of forming.
Torts Torts examines the three basic theories of civil (non-criminal) liability for injuries to persons and property. International torts, negligence and strict liability. These subjects are considered together with causation problems, defenses to liability (such as consent, self-defense, comparative negligence and assumption of risk), and affirmative duties.
Torts Torts examines the three basic theories of civil (non-criminal) liability for injuries to persons and property. International torts, negligence and strict liability. These subjects are considered together with causation problems, defenses to liability (such as consent, self-defense, comparative negligence and assumption of risk), and affirmative duties.
Wills & Estates This course covers the variety of ways in which people can arrange for the passage of their property at their death. Students study common law and statutory methods of dealing with property left by a decedent who did or did not leave a will; the procedures and problems of creating, construing, contesting, or revoking wills; the concerns for providing for surviving spouses and other family members; fiduciary duties in the administration of estates and some of the methods for avoiding the probate of estates.
Immigration Law & Policy Students are introduced to national and international legislation and decisions concerning the entrance and residence in the United States by aliens, including the social, economic and political aspects thereof.
Law, Literature & Philosophy Traditionally, lawyers have played central roles in the organization of society and the administration of justice. They also further the interests of their clients through persuasive argumentation. Using a number of "great books," this course will examine forms of argument and forms of legal authority.
Trial Practice The development of litigative techniques is stressed through student participation in simulated trial situations. Each aspect of the trial is studied and emphasis is placed upon strategy and fact management.
Health Care Law This class explores the financing and regulation of health care, bioethics, the various structures of health care organizations, the physician-patient relationship, professional liability of health care providers, and tort reform for medical injuries.
3L DV&CP Clinic Third-year law students, with a legal intern license, advocate for survivors of domestic violence in a variety of settings. As part of a collaboration with the Legal Aid Society of Cincinnati, students represent clients from the initial interview through trial. Students also represent clients in post-trial matters when necessary to accomplish an equitable result. For example, students have filed objections to decisions and drafted, filed, and argued contempt and other post-trial motions. Students also draft briefs when cases are appealed to the First Appellate District Court and, when an argument is scheduled during the academic year, a student argues the case. Students might participate as domestic violence advocates in other ways as well. For example, students conducted research and assisted in writing an amicus brief filed with the United States Supreme Court in Abbott v. Abbott, involving custody rights. In addition, when the YWCA shelter was threatened with loss of funding, two clinic students testified before the Cincinnati City Council, which voted to restore funding.
3L DV&CP Clinic FP 3L Domestic Violence & Civil Protection Order Clinic Field Placement. You must register concurrently in 3L DV&CPO Class (IRTS 7037).
Deposition Skills This course will introduce taking and defending depositions. Major topics will include an overview of depositions (what depositions are and how they fit into the larger case strategy), preparing for a deposition (creating a deposition outline and exhibits), standard deposition admonitions (and what they actually mean), effective use of questioning (open vs. closed questions and the funnel technique), and form objections. Students will take part in deposition simulations and view videotaped depositions.
Child Protection Advocacy One of the most intrusive governmental actions is the removal of children from their families. The grounds for removal include abuse and neglect. These decisions are made by juvenile and family courts across the nation, resulting in nearly 500,000 children in the child protection system each year. The parties to a child protection action include county social workers, parents, best interests advocates known as Guardians ad Litem (GAL) and Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA Volunteer), and the children. These parties are represented by attorneys in a variety of roles. This course is designed as an introduction to child protection actions and the roles of attorneys participating in them, and current practitioners.
Int'l Commercial Arbitration International arbitration has increased as a function of world trade. With parties unwilling to accept the risks of litigation in the local courts of their foreign business partners, international arbitration agreements have become the leading mechanism for the resolution of international commercial disputes. This course gives students a basic foundation in the mechanics of international commercial arbitration and an understanding of the tactical choices that frequently confront international arbitration practitioners. In particular, the course will examine systematically, through statutes, rules, national and international cases, and treaties, the establishment, operation, and implementation of awards of international commercial arbitration tribunals; the role of national courts in compelling, facilitating, and enforcing or vacating arbitral awards; and policies currently under consideration for changing arbitral practices.
Intro to the Law-Week One FOR GUEST, CERTIFICATE, AND LLM STUDENTS. Prepares the student with common grounding in basic legal concepts, historical context, the language of law and legal reasoning. Introduces the student to the idea of law as a particular institution of government.
Criminal Procedure I This introductory course deals with the constitutional aspects of various police practices, focusing primarily on the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments to the US Constitution. The course specifically addresses the right to counsel; arrest, search and seizure; wiretapping, electronic eavesdropping and the use of secret agents; police interrogation and confession; and the scope and administration of the exclusionary rules.
International Trade Law Discusses the current trends in international commercial policies related to the multilateral trading system developed through the World Trade Organization, Free Trade Agreements and Investment Protection Treaties. Regulation of international trade is studied through the analysis of different sectors of the economy. Special interest is given to the relationship of trade policies with sectoral public policies. Additional interest is given to the recent tendencies of protectionist national economic policies and how they affect the international trading system. Topics are developed in class as a result of continuous discussions with students based on previously assigned readings. Classes are practical and case law based. Current trends are also analyzed through statistical data.
Intro IP Practice 1 The goal of this course is to introduce students to the work new lawyers practicing in the area of intellectual property are likely to encounter in private practice or in the corporate setting. This course will focus on many areas of intellectual property including patents, trademarks, copyrights, and trade secrets and will include discussions and projects related to these IP topics. Some projects might include work on handling of confidential information, joint development issues, and due diligence reviews. This course may also address numerous other practical IP issues such as recognition of your clientâ s IP rights, understanding how to protect those IP rights, and advising clients with respect to enforcement of IP rights.
Individual Research Project(1) Under the direct supervision of a member of the faculty, upper level students engage in original research and prepare for credit a substantial work product. The research project is selected jointly by the student and faculty member. Customarily, the final product will be a research paper, and, in that case, the paper must be 10-15 pages long. The student must both register for the course and present a completed contract by the last day of the drop/add period. Contracts must be turned in on time or students will be dropped from the class. You are limited to five total credits of individual writing per academic year. Credits cannot be adjusted after the add/drop period.
Individual Research Project(1) Under the direct supervision of a member of the faculty, upper level students engage in original research and prepare for credit a substantial work product. The research project is selected jointly by the student and faculty member. Customarily, the final product will be a research paper, and, in that case, the paper must be 10-15 pages long. The student must both register for the course and present a completed contract by the last day of the drop/add period. Contracts must be turned in on time or students will be dropped from the class. You are limited to five total credits of individual writing per academic year. Credits cannot be adjusted after the add/drop period.
Individual Research Project(1) Under the direct supervision of a member of the faculty, upper level students engage in original research and prepare for credit a substantial work product. The research project is selected jointly by the student and faculty member. Customarily, the final product will be a research paper, and, in that case, the paper must be 10-15 pages long. The student must both register for the course and present a completed contract by the last day of the drop/add period. Contracts must be turned in on time or students will be dropped from the class. You are limited to five total credits of individual writing per academic year. Credits cannot be adjusted after the add/drop period.
Individual Research Project(1) Under the direct supervision of a member of the faculty, upper level students engage in original research and prepare for credit a substantial work product. The research project is selected jointly by the student and faculty member. Customarily, the final product will be a research paper, and, in that case, the paper must be 10-15 pages long. The student must both register for the course and present a completed contract by the last day of the drop/add period. Contracts must be turned in on time or students will be dropped from the class. You are limited to five total credits of individual writing per academic year. Credits cannot be adjusted after the add/drop period.
Individual Research Project(2) Under the direct supervision of a member of the faculty, upper level students engage in original research and prepare for credit a substantial work product. The research project is selected jointly by the student and faculty member. Customarily, the final product will be a research paper, and, in that case, the paper must be 20-30 pages long for two credits. The student must both register for the course and present a completed contract by the last day of the drop/add period. Contracts must be turned in on time or students will be dropped from the class. You are limited to five total credits of individual writing per academic year. Credits cannot be adjusted after the add/drop period.
Individual Research Project(2) Under the direct supervision of a member of the faculty, upper level students engage in original research and prepare for credit a substantial work product. The research project is selected jointly by the student and faculty member. Customarily, the final product will be a research paper, and, in that case, the paper must be 20-30 pages long for two credits. The student must both register for the course and present a completed contract by the last day of the drop/add period. Contracts must be turned in on time or students will be dropped from the class. You are limited to five total credits of individual writing per academic year. Credits cannot be adjusted after the add/drop period.
Individual Research Project(2) Under the direct supervision of a member of the faculty, upper level students engage in original research and prepare for credit a substantial work product. The research project is selected jointly by the student and faculty member. Customarily, the final product will be a research paper, and, in that case, the paper must be 20-30 pages long for two credits. The student must both register for the course and present a completed contract by the last day of the drop/add period. Contracts must be turned in on time or students will be dropped from the class. You are limited to five total credits of individual writing per academic year. Credits cannot be adjusted after the add/drop period.
Individual Research Project(2) Under the direct supervision of a member of the faculty, upper level students engage in original research and prepare for credit a substantial work product. The research project is selected jointly by the student and faculty member. Customarily, the final product will be a research paper, and, in that case, the paper must be 20-30 pages long for two credits. The student must both register for the course and present a completed contract by the last day of the drop/add period. Contracts must be turned in on time or students will be dropped from the class. You are limited to five total credits of individual writing per academic year. Credits cannot be adjusted after the add/drop period.
Individual Research Project(2) Under the direct supervision of a member of the faculty, upper level students engage in original research and prepare for credit a substantial work product. The research project is selected jointly by the student and faculty member. Customarily, the final product will be a research paper, and, in that case, the paper must be 20-30 pages long for two credits. The student must both register for the course and present a completed contract by the last day of the drop/add period. Contracts must be turned in on time or students will be dropped from the class. You are limited to five total credits of individual writing per academic year. Credits cannot be adjusted after the add/drop period.
Individual Research Project(3) Under the direct supervision of a member of the faculty, upper level students engage in original research and prepare for credit a substantial work product. The research project is selected jointly by the student and faculty member. Customarily, the final product will be a research paper, and, in that case, the paper must be 35-50 pages long for three credits. The student must both register for the course and present a completed contract by the last day of the drop/add period. Contracts must be turned in on time or students will be dropped from the class. You are limited to five total credits of individual writing per academic year. Credits cannot be adjusted after the add/drop period.
Individual Research Project(3) Under the direct supervision of a member of the faculty, upper level students engage in original research and prepare for credit a substantial work product. The research project is selected jointly by the student and faculty member. Customarily, the final product will be a research paper, and, in that case, the paper must be 35-50 pages long for three credits. The student must both register for the course and present a completed contract by the last day of the drop/add period. Contracts must be turned in on time or students will be dropped from the class. You are limited to five total credits of individual writing per academic year. Credits cannot be adjusted after the add/drop period.
Patent and Trademark FP Patent and Trademark FP
Individual Research Project(1) Under the direct supervision of a member of the faculty, upper level students engage in original research and prepare for credit a substantial work product. The research project is selected jointly by the student and faculty member. Customarily, the final product will be a research paper, and, in that case, the paper must be 10-15 pages long. The student must both register for the course and present a completed contract by the last day of the drop/add period. Contracts must be turned in on time or students will be dropped from the class. You are limited to five total credits of individual writing per academic year. Credits cannot be adjusted after the add/drop period.
   
AM CONST'L LANDMRKS The object of the course is to introduce undergraduate students to several of the most significant Supreme Court rulings in constitutional cases. By intensive study of these landmark cases, the course will invite students toreflect upon historical and contemporary debates about the role of the Court, in contrast to other institutional actors, in assigning authoritative meaning to the Constitution. Discussion will inevitably include in-depth consideration of competing interpretative methods. Goals for the course include the development of a more sophisticated understanding of, and appreciation for, the tension inherent in judicial elaboration of fundamental law based on a written text within the framework of a more general commitment to popular self-government in a federal system. By examining a select set of the most salient rulingschosen from the Court's two-century-plus history, the course will also explore the tension between the concepts of fidelity to constitutional text and the evolution of actual practice. Though the course will not aim to develop proficiency with any particular doctrine, it will serve as an introduction to legal reasoning for those perhaps
Courses for Fall 2016
Course Name Course Description
Individual Research Project(1) Under the direct supervision of a member of the faculty, upper level students engage in original research and prepare for credit a substantial work product. The research project is selected jointly by the student and faculty member. Customarily, the final product will be a research paper, and, in that case, the paper must be 10-15 pages long. The student must both register for the course and present a completed contract by the last day of the drop/add period. Contracts must be turned in on time or students will be dropped from the class. You are limited to five total credits of individual writing per academic year. Credits cannot be adjusted after the add/drop period.
Individual Research Project(2) Under the direct supervision of a member of the faculty, upper level students engage in original research and prepare for credit a substantial work product. The research project is selected jointly by the student and faculty member. Customarily, the final product will be a research paper, and, in that case, the paper must be 20-30 pages long for two credits. The student must both register for the course and present a completed contract by the last day of the drop/add period. Contracts must be turned in on time or students will be dropped from the class. You are limited to five total credits of individual writing per academic year. Credits cannot be adjusted after the add/drop period.
Individual Research Project(3) Under the direct supervision of a member of the faculty, upper level students engage in original research and prepare for credit a substantial work product. The research project is selected jointly by the student and faculty member. Customarily, the final product will be a research paper, and, in that case, the paper must be 35-50 pages long for three credits. The student must both register for the course and present a completed contract by the last day of the drop/add period. Contracts must be turned in on time or students will be dropped from the class. You are limited to five total credits of individual writing per academic year. Credits cannot be adjusted after the add/drop period.
Civil Procedure I This course covers various aspects of civil litigation from the filing of a complaint up to the discovery process. Jurisdiction over the person, venue, and federal subject matter jurisdiction are explored. Coverage is also given to the decision in Erie RR v. Tompkins and its progeny, concerning the applicability of state law in federal courts. The remainder of the course is devoted to service of process, joinder of parties, counterclaims and amendments.
Constitutional Law I This is an introductory course covering judicial review, federalism, separation of powers, and equal protection.
Contracts This course covers basic concepts and doctrines in contract law, including the legal grounds for enforcement of promises, the role of consent in contract formation, contract remedies, and interpretation. Attention is given to both the common law of contracts and to Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code.
Lawyering I: LR&W This course covers skills basic to competent legal research and writing. The students write objective memoranda of law based on hypothetical problems composed by the instructors. The course emphasizes issue recognition, case and statutory interpretation, legal analysis, and the use of plain English.
Torts Torts examines the three basic theories of civil (non-criminal) liability for injuries to persons and property. International torts, negligence and strict liability. These subjects are considered together with causation problems, defenses to liability (such as consent, self-defense, comparative negligence and assumption of risk), and affirmative duties.
Negotiations In this course students learn the "science and art" of negotiation. Students are introduced to significant literature and theory in negotiation and have the opportunity to practice negotiating through a sequenced series of negotiation simulations. This course will involve feedback on recorded negotiation performance; initially ungraded and solely for student benefit. The final grade will be based on a combination of written analysis in the form of analytical journal entries as well as your analysis of recorded negotiation performance.
Client Counseling In this course, students consider the lawyer-client relationship in the context of realistic scenarios, examining the basic strategies and skills a lawyer must master in the lawyer-client relationship. Students will practice and demonstrate the skills of effective client communication and practice management. The instruction and simulations will be set in the business transaction context.
Intro to Intellectual Property This broadest and most basic course gives roughly equal time to the three primary federal doctrines in the area, copyright, trademark, and patent, and gives students a brief introduction to related state law doctrines such as rights of publicity and trade secrets. This course provides students with the basics of each doctrine as well as an understanding of the ways in which they interact with each other.
Business Associations Business Associations. This course covers major topics in the law of agency, partnerships, limited partnerships, limited liability companies and corporations, as well selected aspects of the federal securities laws. This course will replace both Corporations I and Agency, Partnerships, and Unincorporated Associations. Any student who has taken Corporations I in the past may not take Business Associations. If you have taken Agency, Partnerships, and Unincorporated Associations in the past, you may take Business Associations.
Lawyering I: LR&W This course covers skills basic to competent legal research and writing. The students write objective memoranda of law based on hypothetical problems composed by the instructors. The course emphasizes issue recognition, case and statutory interpretation, legal analysis, and the use of plain English.
Lawyering I: LR&W This course covers skills basic to competent legal research and writing. The students write objective memoranda of law based on hypothetical problems composed by the instructors. The course emphasizes issue recognition, case and statutory interpretation, legal analysis, and the use of plain English.
Lawyering I: LR&W This course covers skills basic to competent legal research and writing. The students write objective memoranda of law based on hypothetical problems composed by the instructors. The course emphasizes issue recognition, case and statutory interpretation, legal analysis, and the use of plain English.
Lawyering I: LR&W This course covers skills basic to competent legal research and writing. The students write objective memoranda of law based on hypothetical problems composed by the instructors. The course emphasizes issue recognition, case and statutory interpretation, legal analysis, and the use of plain English.
Constitutional Law I This is an introductory course covering judicial review, federalism, separation of powers, and equal protection.
Contracts This course covers basic concepts and doctrines in contract law, including the legal grounds for enforcement of promises, the role of consent in contract formation, contract remedies, and interpretation. Attention is given to both the common law of contracts and to Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code.
Constitutional Law I This is an introductory course covering judicial review, federalism, separation of powers, and equal protection.
Evidence The goal of this course is for students to know and be able to apply (1) the Federal Rules of Evidence governing relevance, unfair prejudice, character evidence, impeachment, hearsay, and opinion testimony; (2) the rules as they intersect with a few constitutional provisions, such as the Sixth Amendment confrontation right; and (3) some housekeeping rules, such as Rules 102-105, 201, 611, and the Best Evidence rule.
Entrepren&CommDev Clinic Open to 3Lâ s only. Enrollment is limited to 8-10 students selected by the instructor. No later than the first day of class, students must have a â legal intern certificateâ from the Office of Bar Admissions of the Supreme Court of Ohio. In this course, students will staff the Entrepreneurship and Community Development Clinic (ECDC), obtaining â hands onâ experience representing local businesses and entrepreneurs on transactional legal issues critical to their success, including assistance and counseling on entity selection and formation; regulatory compliance and licensing; trademark/copyright protection; lease review and negotiation; contract preparation/review/negotiation; tax - exempt applications; and other legal issues confronting small businesses, both for-profit and nonprofit. Students also will learn how a small law office operates, including procedures for client intake, file maintenance, project tracking, timekeeping, and scheduling. In addition to attending the weekly class, students will be expected to spend approximately10-12 hours per week on their clinic work, with a minimum of 4 of those hours spent working in the clinic offices, located at the law school and the Hamilton County Business Center. The ECDC will represent primarily clients of limited financial means who cannot afford the services of the private bar and will not represent clients in litigation
Entrepren&CommDev FP Entrepreneurship & Community Development Clinic Field Placement. Students will also be concurrently enrolled in BCL7038.
Judicial Extern The classroom component of this course covers an analysis of the methods of selecting judges, speech and money-raising aspects of judicial campaigns, the federal confirmation process, and issues of judicial bias and recusal and behavior on and off the bench. The work performed in the judicial extern field placement is essentially the same as that performed by a law clerk to a judge. It usually involves preparing memoranda on cases, reviewing case files, drafting opinions and orders, and attending court and conferences. The precise tasks performed, however, depend upon the type of court and the style of the judge. SPECIAL NOTES: Concurrent enrollment in Judicial Extern Class and Field placement required. See special memo regarding Judicial Extern Program on website. Complete separate Judicial Extern Preference Form and include transcript and resume. Materials must be submitted to the Registrar by designated due date. Students may not enroll concurrently in Extern programs. May only take Judicial Externship once. Usually offered every semester.
Judicial Extern FP Concurrent enrollment in Judicial Extern Class is required.
Remedies This course covers all forms of ultimate relief in civil actions: damages, restitution, and equitable relief. The first portion deals with the damage remedies in tort, contract, real property, and personal property litigation. The second unit analyzes the alternative remedy of restitution, in law and equity. The course concludes with those cases governing specific relief in equity, specific performance in contract, and injunctions in tort.
Criminal Procedure I This introductory course deals with the constitutional aspects of various police practices, focusing primarily on the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments to the US Constitution. The course specifically addresses the right to counsel; arrest, search and seizure; wiretapping, electronic eavesdropping and the use of secret agents; police interrogation and confession; and the scope and administration of the exclusionary rules.
White Collar Crime This course examines the special problems of proving a guilty mind and a guilty act in the context of business and government activities. Specific emphasis will be placed on corporate criminal liability, personal liability in organizational settings, conspiracy, mail fraud, false statements, perjury and false declarations, obstruction of justice, bribery of public officials, and RICO: The Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act.
Civil Procedure I This course covers various aspects of civil litigation from the filing of a complaint up to the discovery process. Jurisdiction over the person, venue, and federal subject matter jurisdiction are explored. Coverage is also given to the decision in Erie RR v. Tompkins and its progeny, concerning the applicability of state law in federal courts. The remainder of the course is devoted to service of process, joinder of parties, counterclaims and amendments.
Pretrial Practice This course will focus solely on the litigation skills that an attorney must master in order to steer a civil case from the beginning of a dispute to the point immediately preceding a trial. Topics may include: development of the legal theory/theories in a case (causes of action and defenses); pleadings, including state and federal filing rules, proper parties, service considerations, electronic filing, and waiver of service of summons; development of discovery strategies; discovery, including interrogatories, requests for production of documents, requests for admissions, and motions to compel; depositions, taking and defending; experts, including retainer issues, drafting expert reports, and taking/defending expert depositions; pre-trial motion practice; trial-witness preparation; jury instructions and pre-trial statements; and court-ordered mediation and settlement.
Human Rights Seminar One of the strategies for the advancement of human rights is to have a city commit to becoming â A Human Rights City.â This is a research seminar where each member will undertake an assigned topic. We will want to explore whether this has been an effective strategy, as opposed to window dressing, both in other countries, and within the United States. One of the arguments that has been an obstacle to the United States ratification of human rights treaties is that under our federal system, the contents of much of the human rights treaties deals with matters allocated to states rather than the national government. While it is clear that this â federalismâ argument was employed by many who feared that the international human rights commitments would undermine racial segregation, it is accurate that the human rights treaties were different in kind in that they largely focused on obligations to change law within the United States, and yes that a good deal of that law would be at the state level. It is also true that under the Constitution the President & the U.S. Senate are given the responsibility for ratifying treaties, and States have not been brought into the process. The Seminar will explore whether through the portal of the â Cityâ we can take up the challenge of complying with international human rights obligations. We will tackle the hard questions in our exploration of a strategy to create more just communities.
Torts Torts examines the three basic theories of civil (non-criminal) liability for injuries to persons and property. International torts, negligence and strict liability. These subjects are considered together with causation problems, defenses to liability (such as consent, self-defense, comparative negligence and assumption of risk), and affirmative duties.
Legal Drafting This class provides a comprehensive introduction to drafting legal documents in the transactional context, with a heavy emphasis on contracts and internal documents. Students will learn the basic concepts that guide contract drafting and how mastery of these concepts aid in managing risk in legal transactions. Students will complete a number of short drafting exercises and two (possibly three) graded drafting assignments.
Corp Trans: TermSht/Closing This course will take students through a single transaction, beginning with the initial term sheet, continuing through the negotiation and execution of a purchase agreement, and ending with closing and post-closing obligations. By the end of the course, students will acquire a detailed understanding of deal structures and timelines, the ebb and flow of transactions, and the major components of a negotiated agreement. Students will work in teams representing one party to the transaction throughout the entire course. Course work includes required reading, in-class and outside-class drafting assignments, client counseling, and contract negotiation.
Federal Income Tax This course is structured around the two dominant themes of the taxation of individuals under the Internal Revenue Code: what is income, and what is deductible; and when must the taxpayer recognize income, and when can the taxpayer deduct a particular expense. Also the course examines miscellaneous topics such as capital gains and losses, identifying the proper taxpayer, and others.
American Legal History This course provides students with a broad view of how and why the institutions and principles of American law developed into their present forms. The focus is on the relationship between the law and general social, economic, and political trends. The course also seeks to cultivate an understanding of important movements in American legal history. Evaluation will be by final examination.
2L DV&CP Clinic FP 2L Domestic Violence & Civil Protection Order Field Placement. You must also enroll concurrently in the 2L DV&CPO Class (IRTS 7039).
2L DV&CP Clinic As part of collaboration with the Legal Aid Society of Cincinnati, students act as advocates for victims of domestic violence. Second-year students, who cannot be licensed as legal interns in Ohio, participate in interviewing, case preparation, and other aspects of clinic work. Students might participate as domestic violence advocates in other ways as well. For example, students conducted research and assisted in writing an amicus brief filed with the United States Supreme Court in Abbott v. Abbott, involving custody rights. In addition, when the YWCA shelter was threatened with loss of funding, two clinic students testified before the Cincinnati City Council, which voted to restore funding.
Civil Rights Litigation Civil Rights Litigation
LR&W for LLMs Legal Research & Writing for LLM Students
Education Law This course examines legal issues encountered at all levels of education. The course will focus on such problems as academic freedom, curriculum control, censorship, mandatory education, church â state issues, faculty and student rights, tort and civil liability of educational institutions, and educational opportunity, including rights of the handicapped.
Legal Ethics In this course students consider the lawyer-client relationship in the context of realistic scenarios, evaluating the complete choices an ethical lawyer must make to establish an effective lawyer-client relationship. Following an examination of the ABA Model Rules and the Ohio Rules of Professional Conduct, students consider the ethical components of the lawyer-client relationship, with an emphasis on competency, confidentiality, and conflicts of interest. The course also includes substantial instruction in the history, goals, structure, values, and responsibilities of the legal profession and its members.
Federal Courts This course addresses issues of federalism and separation of powers raised by statutes and doctrines which establish and limit federal court jurisdiction. Among the matters addressed are standing, legislative courts, congressional power over federal jurisdiction, the Eleventh Amendment, and the abstention doctrines. Also considered are the role state courts play in the formation and application of doctrines.
Law, Literature & Philosophy Traditionally, lawyers have played central roles in the organization of society and the administration of justice. They also further the interests of their clients through persuasive argumentation. Using a number of "great books," this course will examine forms of argument and forms of legal authority.
Patent Law This course examines the federal statutory system of protection for useful, novel, and non-obvious inventions and those developments that enrich the technological arts. Although not a requisite, students with a science background will find it helpful to them in this course and this field.
Legal Analys BAR EXAM This course serves the dual purpose of equipping students to succeed on the written portions of bar examinations and preparing for legal practice by developing and honing skills relevant to legal analysis, professional and effective written communication, principled advocacy, and management of legal work. Students will receive instruction, practice, critical peer review, and coaching in these skills that will be valuable in taking a bar examination in Ohio or any other jurisdiction. Students will practice these skills using model and previously-administered essays and Multistate Performance Tests (MPTs). Students will also engage in self-assessment exercises addressing learning styles and time/work management issues. Although students will have an opportunity to review some core legal concepts, the focus of this course will be on practicing and developing the professional skills necessary to pass a bar examination and enter the legal profession. This course is not intended to substitute for a bar preparation course taken after Hooding that can help students review core concepts learned throughout law school and learn legal concepts not studied in law school and specific to the jurisdiction in which students wish to practice. Instead, this course will build a strong foundation in the skills necessary to be successful on a bar exam.
Appellate Practice & Procedure This covers the role and function of appellate courts: preserving issues for appeal; appealability; appeal strategy; the record on appeal; briefs and oral argument; operating procedures of appellate courts; motion practice; extraordinary writs; and related matters. Each student prepares a critique of an actual case pending in an appellate court.
Media Law This seminar will explore current issues in the law as it relates to media. Students will examine such topics as libel, discovery of editorial materials and privileges, privacy and news-gathering torts, and access to information, including issues arising under the Freedom of Information Act. Throughout the course, hypothetical "problems" will be used to illustrate the points being discussed.
Legal Extern The classroom component of the Legal Extern Program emphasizes practical lawyering skills, law office economics, and ethical issues. In their field placements, legal externs work under the supervision of attorneys in local, state, and federal public agencies, for legal aid and other non-profit organizations, and in some other organizations in the private sector. To apply for an externship, return the completed form with a resume and a transcript to the College of Law Registrar by the due date set for the term.
Legal Extern FP Concurrent enrollment in LITG 7016 is required.
Neuroscience & Law What are adolescents, psychopaths, and white-collar fraud artists thinking? Why does emotional trauma for victims of abuse last so long? Why is eyewitness memory so poor? Do violent video games lead to violent children? Lawyers and courts, including the U.S. Supreme Court, are already integrating neuroscience research into their arguments and opinions on questions such as these. This Neuroscience and the Law course will introduce the exciting new field of â neurolawâ by covering issues such as the neuroscience of criminal culpability, brain-based lie detection, emotions, decision making, and much more. How the legal system can and should respond to new insights on topics such as adolescent brain development, addiction, psychopathy, Alzheimerâ s, the effects of combat on soldiersâ brains, and concussions from sports injuries will be discussed and analyzed. (Note that all scientific material in the class will be presented in an accessible manner; no previous science back ground is required or assumed.) Graduate students from other colleges at UC may join the class. Special Note: Taking this course satisfies only one of the graduation requirements (seminar or writing). If you take this course and have not yet satisfied the seminar requirement, you will be deemed to have met the seminar requirement. However, if you take this course and you have already met the seminar requirement, you will be deemed to have met the writing requirement. Two, separate courses are required to satisfy both the seminar and writing requirements. No one course satisfies them both.
Intro to Law & Psychiatry This course introduces the student to the issues arising from the interaction of mentally ill or incapacitated individuals with the American civil and criminal justice system. It also considers the practice and structure of the mental health profession. This class is required for Weaver Fellows.
Advertising Law This class explores copyright, trademark, right of publicity, and other intellectual property issues, as well as defamation and product disparagement issues surrounding the creative world of advertising. Topics will include logos; products and their packaging; the use of images in advertising; celebrity sponsorships; false advertising, comparative advertising; contests and lotteries; internet advertising; government regulation of "unfair" trade practices; children's advertising; and the relationship between First Amendment concerns and commercial speech.
Mental Health Law I:CvlComtmnt In this class, we will focus on the legal aspects of publicly-financed mental health care and the traditional and current governmental responses to mental disability. This course is open to Weaver Fellows; other interested students should contact the College of Law Registrar.
Trial Practice The development of litigative techniques is stressed through student participation in simulated trial situations. Each aspect of the trial is studied and emphasis is placed upon strategy and fact management.
Legal Ethics In this course students consider the lawyer-client relationship in the context of realistic scenarios, evaluating the complete choices an ethical lawyer must make to establish an effective lawyer-client relationship. Following an examination of the ABA Model Rules and the Ohio Rules of Professional Conduct, students consider the ethical components of the lawyer-client relationship, with an emphasis on competency, confidentiality, and conflicts of interest. The course also includes substantial instruction in the history, goals, structure, values, and responsibilities of the legal profession and its members.
US Legal System (LLM) US Legal System (LLM)
Int'l Litigation & Arbitration The course is designed to introduce the student to international commercial arbitration. The course will focus on preparing the student both for advising companies on negotiating effective dispute resolution provisions in cross-border commercial contracts and representing clients having a dispute before an international commercial arbitration tribunal. The course will begin by emphasizing the importance of a well-crafted dispute resolution provision in cross-border agreements and the inadequacies of leaving dispute resolution to national courts. The course will then address the differences in customs and legal traditions in Europe, Asia and Latin America and the influence of such differences on the manner in which disputes are resolved and arbitrations are conducted. The student will be introduced to the principal international arbitral institutions administrating international arbitrations and their procedural rules, and also to the UNCITRAL Arbitration Rules (for ad hoc non-administered arbitrations) and investor/state arbitrations under bilateral investment treaties. In addition, there will be a brief introduction to the Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods. The remainder of the course will demonstrate, using a hypothetical international business dispute, the procedures step-by-step typically used in an international commercial arbitration, including: commencement and issuance of the statements of claims and defense, the selection of arbitrators, the disclosure process, the pleadings and submissions of pre-hearing briefs and memorials, the presentation of written and oral evidence at the hearing, the issuance of the award, the role of courts in enforcing arbitral agreements and ultimately enforcement or vacatur of the award under the New York Convention and a variety of specific arbitration laws, including those in the United States, England, France, Hong Kong and China.
Freedom Center Journal:Staff The Freedom Center Journal of Law and History engages its readership on issues historically driving African-American intellectual thought while challenging its student membership to fully develop their individual talents to compete on terms of academic equality in an international society governed by law and legal institutions.
Freedom Center Journal:Staff The Freedom Center Journal of Law and History engages its readership on issues historically driving African-American intellectual thought while challenging its student membership to fully develop their individual talents to compete on terms of academic equality in an international society governed by law and legal institutions.
Freedom Center Journal Editor Editor Position: By permission of instructor.
Human Rights Quarterly: Staff Participating students engage in the selection and editing of articles for publication in the University of Cincinnati Human Rights Quarterly. Human Rights Quarterly Staff only.
Human Rights Quarterly: Editor Editor Position: By permission of Instructor. Participating students engage in the selection and editing of articles for publication in the University of Cincinnati Human Rights Quarterly. Human Rights Quarterly Staff only.
Immigra&Nat'lity LR:Staff Participating students engage in selection and preparation of articles for publication in the Review. Students also write notes and comments for publication in the Review.
Immigra&Nat'lity LR:Staff Participating students engage in selection and preparation of articles for publication in the Review. Students also write notes and comments for publication in the Review.
Immigra&Nat'l LR: EIC Editor-in-Chief; by permission of Instructor.
IP & Computer Law Jrnl The Intellectual Property and Computer Law Journal is dedicated to furthering knowledge associated with the research and practice of intellectual property law, computer law, and related fields concerning domestic and international media and telecommunications policy. The Journal will be published online. The Registrar will enroll students selected to participate in the necessary class through the registration system.
IP & Computer Law Jrnl The Intellectual Property and Computer Law Journal is dedicated to furthering knowledge associated with the research and practice of intellectual property law, computer law, and related fields concerning domestic and international media and telecommunications policy. The Journal will be published online. The Registrar will enroll students selected to participate in the necessary class through the registration system.
IP&CLJ Ed Limited to students identified by supervising faculty member.
Moot Court Competition This is the intramural competition for the Moot Court Honor Board open to all 2L students. Students wishing to participate in the competition should enroll in this class.
Moot Court Honor Board Open to 2L students in their Spring Semester; prerequisite for Moot Court Executive Editor. Prereq: To enroll you must: Have taken LITG7017 Moot Court Competition
Mt Ct Sr. Semester For 3L students in both fall and spring semesters.
Mt Ct Rendigs Prob Writer Open to the Rendigs Problem Writer and by permission of instructor only. Prereq: To enroll you must: Have taken LITG7017 Moot Court Competition
Mt Ct Exec Director Open to the Executive Director only.
Law Review 2L Participating students engage in the selection and editing of articles for publication in the University of Cincinnati Law Review. Some students also write notes and comments for publication in the Review. Students must participate in a competition and be selected to participate. The College of Law Registrar will schedule you in the appropriate course; it is your responsibility to make sure you have room in your schedule to accommodate the addition of this course.
Law Review 3L Participating students engage in the selection and editing of articles for publication in the University of Cincinnati Law Review. Some students also write notes and comments for publication in the Review. Students must participate in a competition and be selected to participate. The College of Law Registrar will schedule you in the appropriate course; it is your responsibility to make sure you have room in your schedule to accommodate the addition of this course.
Law Review Contributing Editor By permission only.
Law Review Blog Editor The blog has student, professor and practitioner contributors. Knowledge of Bluebook and Texas Law Review Manual for Style and Usage, and ability to coordinate. The job responsibilities of the Blog Editor would include: â ¢ Actively solicit and select practitioners for blog posts â ¢ Ensure Contributing Members, Guest or Student Editors, and Student Contributors all meet posting requirements ensuring conformance with the Texas Law Review Manual for Style and Usage and that all footnote content conform with the Bluebook â ¢ Coordinating promotion and utilization of the blog including monitoring any comments/feedback. In recognition of the responsibilities of the Blog Editor, this position will receive 2 non-classroom credit hours; it would not meet the writing or seminar requirement. This position would only be open to 3L students. The UC Law Review Blog is of great importance to the future of the Law Review. With a dedicated position overseeing the blog, the maintenance and care of the blog can be guaranteed. By Permission Only
Law Review Ed/Exec Ed Participating students engage in the selection and editing of articles for publication in the University of Cincinnati Law Review. Students also write notes and comments for publication in the Review.
Contracts This course covers basic concepts and doctrines in contract law, including the legal grounds for enforcement of promises, the role of consent in contract formation, contract remedies, and interpretation. Attention is given to both the common law of contracts and to Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code.
Contracts This course covers basic concepts and doctrines in contract law, including the legal grounds for enforcement of promises, the role of consent in contract formation, contract remedies, and interpretation. Attention is given to both the common law of contracts and to Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code.
Critical Race Theory Critical race theory (â CRTâ ) developed in the early and mid â 1980s as a response to both the substance and style of traditional legal scholarship. Substantively, critical race scholars rejected not only the â colorblindâ approach to legal issues that renders invisible the particular and often divergent experiences of people of color vis â à â vis the law, but also liberal approaches emphasizing formal equality and individual civil rights, as well as the radical critiques of critical legal theorists and their â trashingâ of civil rights. Stylistically, critical race theorists often employed new methodologies for legal scholarship, including storytelling and postmodern analysis. CRT advocates effectively used these methods to illuminate and define the centrality of race as a foundational feature of U.S. law. Since its emergence, there have been a number of developments in CRT, as is the case with every specialized field of study. More recently, second generation CRT scholars have focused on the â anti â essentialistâ challenge presented by a diverse community of race crits along racial, ethnic, gender, sexuality, and class lines, among others. Participants in this class will examine the genesis of CRT and its subsequent development, and will explore further CRTâ s possibilities and limitations. We will address some of the following questions: Has CRT been successful, in light of its theoretical commitments, in changing the law and/or the lives of marginalized people for the better? How have non â legal scholarly disciplines influenced and impacted the development of CRT? Is there such a thing as â critical race praxis,â and if so, what does it mean and require?
Indigent Defense Clinic Through the Office of the Hamilton County Public Defender, students provide representation to indigent criminal defendants in misdemeanor cases. Each student is closely supervised by a licensed attorney and handles all aspects of the case, from the initial client interview and investigation to motions practice and trial advocacy. During the year-long program, students must commit 15 hours each week to the clinic, including participation in a weekly classroom components.
Indigent Defense Clinic FP Concurrent enrollment required in LITG 7051 as well as the full-year.
Public Int Honrs Fellow Public Interest Honors Fellowship Companion Class: This course must be taken simultaneously with the Public Interest Honors Fellowship, and it must be taken both semesters during the academic year. The class component consists of a two-day orientation blast class, subject matter specific instruction in domestic relations and estate planning issues, instruction and simulations in issues pertaining to underserved clients, and guest lectures from volunteer attorneys and court personnel. Students must complete specified written assignments and meet individually with the course instructor. Public Interest Honors Fellowship: Public Interest Honors Fellowships are open only to third year law students eligible to obtain a limited license in Ohio and require a commitment for the entire academic year. Selected students will obtain advanced practical experience (under the supervision of practicing attorneys) by representing selected underserved clients in need of domestic relations and/or estate planning services. The PIHF will interview clients, draft appropriate documents, review and execute those documents with the clients, and appear in court where necessary under the supervision of six different practicing attorneys who will rotate among the students to ensure that each student benefits from the perspective and wisdom of multiple attorneys. To apply for an externship, you need to send resume and letter of interest by July 1st to supervising faculty member.
Public Int Honors FP This course must be taken simultaneously with the Public Interest Honors Fellowship, and it must be taken both semesters during the academic year.
Secured Transactions This course focuses on laws governing secured transactions, specifically as set forth in Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code. The topics addressed include the creation and perfection of security interests in personal property, priorities and remedies upon default in these secured transactions, and the interactions of the laws governing secured transactions with the Bankruptcy Code.
TP Team: Comp Prep Full-year commitment required. Students will prepare and enter trial competitions in the fall and spring under the supervision of attorney-coaches.
Wills & Estates This course covers the variety of ways in which people can arrange for the passage of their property at their death. Students study common law and statutory methods of dealing with property left by a decedent who did or did not leave a will; the procedures and problems of creating, construing, contesting, or revoking wills; the concerns for providing for surviving spouses and other family members; fiduciary duties in the administration of estates and some of the methods for avoiding the probate of estates.
Innocence Project:WrongConv In this course, students examine the various types of evidence that might lead to the wrongful conviction of innocent persons. They will also consider the roles police, prosecutors, and defense lawyers play in the criminal justice system, with an emphasis on discovering how errors can lead to the conviction of the innocent. SPECIAL NOTES: Field Study in the spring semester is required.
Payment Systems This problems-based course covers Articles 3, 4 and 4A of the Uniform Commercial Code. It includes what has been traditionally known as "commercial paper" and the law of negotiable instruments, now codified in Article 3, the check collection system under Articles 3 and 4, and funds transfers under Article 4A.
Technology in the Law Practice Technology is changing the practice of law in all fields and venues. This course will provide students with the theoretical and practical background to understand these changes and to positively impact their firm's or organization's responses to such challenges. Areas of special focus include case and client management; document management and electronic discovery; information literacy; presentation technologies; and ethical implications. Readings and guest speakers will address both general technological issues as well as specific legal ramifications. Students will participate through their course projects in creating materials for a field of legal education that is still early in the process of forming.
Real Estate Transactions This class will focus on practical, real life situations involved in residential and commercial real estate transactions. The emphasis of the course will be on drafting documents appropriately, in order to avoid disputes. Areas covered will include: Attorneyâ s and brokerâ s roles in the transaction; the contract of sale; due diligence during the transaction; title assurance; and financing including mortgage foreclosures and distressed sales.
Computer Crime Law Computer Crime Law
Employment Law This course focuses on the legal relationship between employer and the individual employee. It will cover the common law aspects of that relationship, particularly the employment at will doctrine. It will then examine common law, contract, and statutory modifications of the doctrine. Statutes that may be examined include whistle-blower protection, unemployment and workersâ compensation acts, the Fair Labor Standards Act, the Family and Medical Leave Act, and federal discrimination statutes. The course also covers other key features of the employment relationship including privacy concerns and contracts relating to protecting certain employer interests. The course is recommended for students contemplating a labor or employment law, corporate, or general practice.
Law Continuing Full-time Administrative Use Only.
IP & Computer Law Jrnl EIC Intellectual Property & Computer Law Journal Editor-in-Chief. By permission of supervising faculty/instructor.
Business Associations Business Associations. This course covers major topics in the law of agency, partnerships, limited partnerships, limited liability companies and corporations, as well selected aspects of the federal securities laws. This course will replace both Corporations I and Agency, Partnerships, and Unincorporated Associations. Any student who has taken Corporations I in the past may not take Business Associations. If you have taken Agency, Partnerships, and Unincorporated Associations in the past, you may take Business Associations.
TP Team: Comp Prep Full-year commitment required. Students will prepare and enter trial competitions in the fall and spring under the supervision of attorney-coaches.
Intro to Law (LLM) REQUIRED for all incoming LLM students.