Law

Fall 2021 Course Offerings

First Year Courses

Instructor: Lenhart
Instructor:
Solimine
Instructor:
Sperino

Description:

This course covers various aspects of civil litigation from the filing of a complaint up to the discovery process. Jurisdiction over the person, venue, and federal subject matter jurisdiction are explored. Coverage is also given to the decision in Erie RR v. Tompkins and its progeny, concerning the applicability of state law in federal courts. The remainder of the course is devoted to service of process, joinder of parties, counterclaims and amendments.

Instructor: Bilionis
Instructor: Bryant

Description: 

This is an introductory course that covers the framing and adoption of the Constitution; the practice and implications of judicial review; methods of constitutional interpretation; the Constitution’s enumeration and limitation of the powers of the national government; principles of federalism and the sovereignty of states in the federal system; the distribution of powers across the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of the national government; and the constitutional guarantee of “the equal protection of the laws” established with the adoption of the Fourteenth Amendment.

Instructor: Cogan
Instructor: Houh
Instructor: Tomain

Description:

This course on contracts is an introduction to the law that governs agreements for the future exchange of performances. Topics include the formation of contracts, their interpretation and content, grounds for nonenforcement and nonperformance, and remedies for breach. We will focus on learning the rules of contract law, identifying what rules apply to particular disputes (and what rules do not), understanding why disputes arise, and appreciating the roles of lawyers in contract matters.

Instructor: Oliver (2 sections)
Instructor: Smith (2 sections)
Instructor:
McCord (2 sections)

Description:

This course covers skills basic to competent legal research and writing. The students write objective memoranda of law based on hypothetical problems composed by the instructors. The course emphasizes issue recognition, case and statutory interpretation, legal analysis, and the use of plain English.

Instructor: Bard
Instructor: Malloy
Instructor: Sperino

Description:

Torts examines the three basic theories of civil (non-criminal) liability for injuries to persons and property. International torts, negligence and strict liability. These subjects are considered together with causation problems, defenses to liability (such as consent, self-defense, comparative negligence and assumption of risk), and affirmative duties.

Upper Level Courses

Instructor: Mank

Description:

Government agencies increasingly regulate the marketplace, health and safety, and provide basic services. This course explores the constitutional powers and limitations on agency action, judicial review of agencies, and the procedures with which agencies must comply in regulating or providing benefits.

Instructor: Krafte

Description:

This class explores copyright, trademark, right of publicity, and other intellectual property issues, as well as defamation and product disparagement issues surrounding the creative world of advertising. Topics will include logos; products and their packaging; the use of images in advertising; celebrity sponsorships; false advertising, comparative advertising; contests and lotteries; internet advertising; government regulation of "unfair" trade practices; children's advertising; and the relationship between First Amendment concerns and commercial speech.

Instructors: DeWine, Stier

Description:

This course covers the role and function of appellate courts: preserving issues for appeal; appealability; appeal strategy; the record on appeal; briefs and oral argument; operating procedures of appellate courts; motion practice; extraordinary writs; and related matters. Students will complete three writing assignments: a jurisdictional memorandum requesting that the Ohio Supreme Court exercise its jurisdiction over an appeal, a memorandum in opposition to jurisdiction, and an analysis of a pending appeal. SPECIAL NOTE: Taking this course satisfies only one of the graduation requirements (seminar or writing). If you take this course and have not yet satisfied the seminar requirement, you will be deemed to have met the seminar requirement. However, if you take this course and you have already met the seminar requirement, you will be deemed to have met the writing requirement. Two, separate courses are required to satisfy both the seminar and writing requirements. No one course satisfies them both.

Instructor: Bai

Description:

This course covers major topics in the law of agency, partnerships, limited partnerships, limited liability companies and corporations, as well as selected aspects of the federal securities laws.

Instructor: Mangan

Description:

Virtually all forms of legal practice require a basic understanding of fundamental business concepts. This course is designed to help students gain a basic understanding of accounting and finance principles as well as general business concepts. We will cover topics such as reading financial statements, understanding cash flow, accounting requirements, and investment principles. SPECIAL NOTE: Students with an MBA, joint JD/MBA, and undergraduate finance or accounting majors are ineligible for the course.

Instructor: Bard

Description:

In January 2020, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control reported the deaths of nine people in Wuhan, China, from pneumonia caused by a novel Corona Virus. This report was concerning because although a member of a category of viruses that include the common cold, Coronaviruses also can mutate into a much more severe respiratory illness. In recent history, two deadly forms of Coronavirus had appeared, SARS and MERS, but both had inexplicably receded quickly, and neither had spread extensively. Unfortunately, this new variant, now called Covid-19, while slightly less lethal than its cousins, turned out to be quite serious and highly transmissible. Within six months, it had spread worldwide and was responsible for millions of cases and hundreds of thousands of deaths. Covid-19 is sufficiently different from other viruses that it did not respond to existing treatments. Even worse, the longer Covid-19 lasted, the clearer it became that while not every person who contracted it died or even required hospitalization, many were left with significant damage to not just the lungs but almost every organ in the body.

This course focuses on the intersection between the Covid-19 virus and the U.S. legal system. Just as the scope and scale of Covid-19 has challenged the limits of the health care system, it has challenged the U.S. legal system. Until now, there has been no need for long term, widescale measures such as travel restrictions or mask mandates. Covid-19 has illustrated existing tensions between the need to limit the spread of disease and the civil liberties enjoyed by every citizen of the United States. These include the freedom to travel, worship, and choose the structure of their child’s education. Since Covid-19 has emerged at a time when a significant amount of public discussion and debate occurs on platforms controlled by private industry, it has become necessary for the law to assess efforts by these companies to curb the spread of disinformation.

In addition to conflicts between individuals and the government, Covid-19 raises important issues regarding the balance of power between the federal government and individual states as well as between states and their political subdivisions such as counties and cities. It has also revealed the structural racism and implicit bias that have been evidenced by higher death rates among racial underserved populations, such as Blacks and Native Americans, as well as people living with disabilities and people who identify as LGBTQ+. These same inequalities result in inequitable access to methods of preventing infection such as personal protective equipment (PPE), vaccines, experimental treatments, and opportunities to socially distance. Finally, we will look at some of the significant legal questions involving the role of private actors such as employers and retailers, in helping or hindering efforts to control infectious disease.

Topics: This course will look at the topics listed below:

Scope and limits of federal/state/local authority to mitigate potential pandemic harms by issuing emergency orders including mandating vaccination and mask wearing.
Right of individuals to access affordable health care treatment and services;
Law and ethics of health care resource rationing;
Effects of racism and systemic bias in access to care Role and responsibility of the federal Food and Drug Administration under its national emergency authority;
Scope and application of employment and disability anti-discrimination laws;
Law and policy issues implicated by potential impacts on special populations (health care providers, individuals with underlying health conditions, essential employees, and socioeconomically disadvantaged groups); and Privacy and civil liberties challenges associated with the use of artificial intelligence (AI) based surveillance technology, including facial recognition, to track and trace individuals.

While the course will focus on U.S. Law, it will also consider these questions in the context of international comparisons and trends, including issues of diversity and inclusion/exclusion, as well as the response of other countries to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Instructors: Cook, Helfrich, Washington-Childs

Description:

One of the most intrusive governmental actions is the removal of children from their families. The grounds for removal include abuse and neglect. These decisions are made by juvenile and family courts across the nation, resulting in nearly 500,000 children in the child protection system each year. The parties to a child protection action include county social workers, parents, best interests advocates known as Guardians ad Litem (GAL) and Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA Volunteer), and the children. These parties are represented by attorneys in a variety of roles. This course is designed as an introduction to child protection actions and the roles of attorneys participating in them, and current practitioners.

Instructors: Cook, Helfrich, Washington-Childs

Description:

One of the most intrusive governmental actions is the removal of children from their families. The grounds for removal include abuse and neglect. These decisions are made by juvenile and family courts across the nation, resulting in nearly 500,000 children in the child protection system each year. The parties to a child protection action include county social workers, parents, best interests advocates known as Guardians ad Litem (GAL) and Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA Volunteer), and the children. These parties are represented by attorneys in a variety of roles. This course is designed as an introduction to child protection actions and the roles of attorneys participating in them, and current practitioners.

Instructor: Aaron

Description:

Most lawyers agree that practicing law would be much simpler without (autonomous) clients. But then, practice would be without purpose: whom would we represent? This intensive workshop course focuses on the realities of working with clients, from the initial lawyer-client interview through the challenges of counseling the fully informed client toward wise and ethical decision-making. Short exercises, presentations, video, and role simulations will focus upon how to communicate legal concepts, conduct interest-based inquiry and advice, work with client emotion and psychology, and introduce basic risk analysis. We will touch upon effective use of voice, gesture, and body language in the lawyer-client counseling context. Finally, we will address the most difficult counseling challenge: how to give a client bad news while maintaining client rapport, trust, and confidence. After the workshop, students will complete an individual final counseling skills exercise. The instruction and simulations will be set in legal dispute contexts. This is a required course that must be taken in the second year, unless you have met the requirement in another way. Students who participate in other experiences in the second year may have met the Client Counseling Requirement and are not required to take this course. These students, along with 3Ls who have not taken a client counseling course, will be permitted to take this Client Counseling class only if seats remain after students are placed in the sections of the course who must take it.

Instructor: Bai

Description:

This course teaches concepts and methodologies used by corporations in major financing activities, as well as legal issues that may arise in those activities. Course materials are divided into four parts: equity financing, debt financing, valuation methodologies, and financial derivatives. For equity financing, discussions will focus on the IPO process, ADRs and GDRs, rights offerings and stock repurchases. For debt financing, discussions will focus on bond features and trading environment, bond issuance, valuation and risk management, convertible bonds, key provisions in an indenture and legal implications, characteristics of medium term notes and commercial paper programs. For valuation methodologies, discussions will focus on discounted cash flows, net present values, and dividend discount models. For financial derivatives, discussions will focus on options trading, pricing and risk management, the futures market and interest rate swaps.

Instructor: Vazquez

Description:

This introductory course deals with the constitutional aspects of various police practices, focusing primarily on the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments to the US Constitution. The course specifically addresses the right to counsel; arrest, search and seizure; wiretapping, electronic eavesdropping and the use of secret agents; police interrogation and confession; and the scope and administration of the exclusionary rules.

Instructor: Houh

Description:

This course explores the foundations and central tenets of Critical Race Theory (“CRT”), a scholarly movement that emerged in the 1980s as an offshoot of Critical Legal Studies (“CLS”). Since then, CRT has developed into an expansive and diverse field of scholarship in its own right. Most, however, would characterize CRT as centrally concerned with (1) using critiques of liberalism and colorblind ideology to expose how racism (and, particularly, white supremacy) is structurally and discursively embedded in and perpetuated by the law, and (2) generating and applying more inclusive and liberatory modes of legal analysis, such as intersectionality, to effect lasting social change. CRT scholars over the last 30 years have produced a diverse range of robust CRT spinoffs, such as LatCrit, QueerCrit, AsianCrit, and ClassCrit (and, to be certain, several other “—Crits”); in fact, since its inception CRT has arguably overtaken CLS within the legal academy. CRT’s interdisciplinary reach and impact during the past three decades likewise cannot be overstated, as it has been widely influential across many fields, including (but not limited to) education theory, sociology, anthropology, psychology, and American studies. This course will begin with an exploration of CRT’s origins in Critical Legal Studies, as well as an introduction to “racial formation theory,” which was contemporaneously introduced in the mid-1980s in the fields of sociology and ethnic studies. Following the introductory study of CRT’s origins and key aspects of racial formation theory, several weeks will be spent reading and discussing foundational CRT texts, primarily comprising “first generation” works (in their full and unedited forms) from 1976-1993, as well as a few later writings. After mastering CRT foundations, the course will move on to the more difficult question of CRT “praxis.” That is, how can CRT insights be used to engage more effectively in social justice advocacy and lawyering? How does one navigate the difficult terrain between CRT praxis and conventional legal practices, both as a student and as a lawyer?

Instructor: Lockwood

Description:

The seminar will address a range of issues facing women around the world, and the international and comparative law that has developed to address the equality rights, se critical problems. Initial focus will be upon the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of discrimination against women, a widely ratified treaty. Issues such as reproductive rights, female genital mutilation, honor crimes, equality doctrines and gender discrimination, freedom of religion vs. women’s rights, regional approaches to women’s rights, economic empowerment and employment discrimination, and domestic violence will be amongst the issues covered in the seminar. Students will be required to write a paper and make a presentation.

Instructor: Woodard

Description:

This course will introduce taking and defending depositions. Major topics will include an overview of depositions (what depositions are and how they fit into the larger case strategy), preparing for a deposition (creating a deposition outline and exhibits), standard deposition admonitions (and what they actually mean), effective use of questioning (open vs. closed questions and the funnel technique), and form objections. Students will take part in deposition simulations and view videotaped depositions.

Instructor: Williams

Description:

In this short course, students will meet daily in 3-hour sessions to explore the roots of structural racism, examine its various manifestations in the U.S. legal system, and critique proposals to eradicate it. Readings will survey historical and legal sources to provide an understanding of race’s role in establishing social hierarchy in this nation. This course requires students to prepare discussion questions for each class meeting, participate in class discussion, and write short reflection papers after each session.

Instructor: Malloy

Description:

Disability Law introduces areas of U.S. domestic law and policy that address the civil rights, needs, and treatment of persons with disabilities. The course covers the Americans with Disabilities Act, some discussion of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and the Fair Housing Act, and a brief overview of international disability law, specifically the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Topics include the following: the challenge of defining disability; the social and medical models of disability; the nature and causes of disability discrimination; the proper scope of legal regulation; the costs and benefits of accommodation; the overlapping and distinctive features of regulating discrimination in different domains such as employment, education, and public accommodations; what disability law and theory can teach antidiscrimination law more generally; and the role of extra-legal knowledge in the legal project of responding to disability discrimination. The course has no prerequisites and is open to LLMs and non-law students as well as to JD candidates. Grades will be based on class participation, potential response papers, and a final seminar paper and presentation.

SPECIAL NOTE: Taking this course satisfies only one of the graduation requirements (seminar or writing). If you take this course and have not yet satisfied the seminar requirement, you will be deemed to have met the seminar requirement. However, if you take this course and you have already met the seminar requirement, you will be deemed to have met the writing requirement. Two, separate courses are required to satisfy both the seminar and writing requirements. No one course satisfies them both.

Instructor: Lucas

Description:

As part of collaboration with the Legal Aid Society of Cincinnati, students act as advocates for victims of domestic violence. Advocacy includes interviewing and counseling clients, helping clients in civil protection order cases as well as issues as they relate to family law. Second-year students, who cannot be licensed as legal interns in Ohio, participate in interviewing, case preparation, and other aspects of clinic work.

Instructor: Lucas

Description:

2L Domestic Violence & Civil Protection Order Field Placement. You must also enroll concurrently in the 2L DV&CPO Class (IRTS 7039). As part of collaboration with the Legal Aid Society of Cincinnati, students act as advocates for victims of domestic violence. Advocacy includes interviewing and counseling clients, helping clients in civil protection order cases as well as issues as they relate to family law. Second-year students, who cannot be licensed as legal interns in Ohio, participate in interviewing, case preparation, and other aspects of clinic work.

Instructor: Lucas

Description:

As part of collaboration with the Legal Aid Society of Cincinnati, students act as advocates for victims of domestic violence. Second-year students, who cannot be licensed as legal interns in Ohio, participate in interviewing, case preparation, and other aspects of clinic work. Third year students must apply for and obtain an intern license before the start of the semester. Under the direct supervision of a supervising attorney, students will represent clients in court.

Instructor: Lucas

Description:

You must register concurrently in 3L DV&CPO Class (IRTS 7037). As part of collaboration with the Legal Aid Society of Cincinnati, students act as advocates for victims of domestic violence. Second-year students, who cannot be licensed as legal interns in Ohio, participate in interviewing, case preparation, and other aspects of clinic work. Third year students must apply for and obtain an intern license before the start of the semester. Under the direct supervision of a supervising attorney, students will represent clients in court.

Instructor: Schneider

Description:

This course examines legal issues encountered at all levels of education. The course will focus on such problems as academic freedom, curriculum control, censorship, mandatory education, church – state issues, faculty and student rights, tort and civil liability of educational institutions, and educational opportunity, including rights of the handicapped. SPECIAL NOTE: Taking this course satisfies only one of the graduation requirements (seminar or writing). If you take this course and have not yet satisfied the seminar requirement, you will be deemed to have met the seminar requirement. However, if you take this course and you have already met the seminar requirement, you will be deemed to have met the writing requirement. Two, separate courses are required to satisfy both the seminar and writing requirements. No one course satisfies them both.

Description:

The goal of this course is to introduce students to the legal underpinnings of today’s democratic politics, the historical struggle over the structure of democratic institutions, and the practical consequences that follow from different institutional arrangements. As time allows, students will examine the history, law, and contemporary legal and policy debates regarding the individual right to vote, the districting and apportionment process (including partisan and racial gerrymandering), and the financing of campaigns and independent expenditures.

Instructor: Hubbard

Description:

This course surveys the major legislative and executive provisions prohibiting various types of discrimination in employment. Discrimination is considered in the context of hiring, promotion, discharge, benefits, conditions, and the like. Consideration is also given to the procedures applicable to employment discrimination cases.

Instructor: Sperino

Description:

This course focuses on the legal relationship between employer and the individual employee. It will cover the common law aspects of that relationship, particularly the employment at will doctrine. It will then examine common law, contract, and statutory modifications of the doctrine. Statutes that may be examined include whistle-blower protection, unemployment and workers’ compensation acts, the Fair Labor Standards Act, the Family and Medical Leave Act, and federal discrimination statutes. The course also covers other key features of the employment relationship including privacy concerns and contracts relating to protecting certain employer interests. The course is recommended for students contemplating a labor or employment law, corporate, or general practice.

Instructor: Schneider

Description:

This course will introduce students to employment-based immigration law. Students in the course will learn about visa classifications that require an employer/sponsor and permit the foreign national to work in the United States. Students will engage in one or more writing projects dealing with obtaining visas in the employer-sponsored immigration context. The course will be focused on the practice of law and assignments will be similar to those given to a first year associate in the practice.

Instructor: Mangan

Description:

Students will also be concurrently enrolled in BCL7038. In this course, students will staff the Entrepreneurship and Community Development Clinic (ECDC), obtaining “hands on” experience representing local businesses and entrepreneurs on transactional legal issues critical to their success, including assistance and counseling on entity selection and formation; regulatory compliance and licensing; trademark/copyright protection; lease review and negotiation; contract preparation/review/negotiation; tax-exempt applications; and other legal issues confronting small businesses, both for-profit and nonprofit. Students also will learn how a small law office operates, including procedures for client intake, file maintenance, project tracking, timekeeping, and scheduling. In addition to attending the weekly class, students will be expected to spend approximately 10-12 hours per week on their clinic work, with a minimum of 3 of those hours spent working in the clinic offices at the law school. The ECDC will represent primarily clients of limited financial means who cannot afford the services of the private bar and will not represent clients in litigation or in proceedings before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

SPECIAL NOTES: Interested students should look for email announcements regarding information sessions about the Clinic and how to apply.

Instructor: Mangan

Description:

In this course, students will staff the Entrepreneurship and Community Development Clinic (ECDC), obtaining “hands on” experience representing local businesses and entrepreneurs on transactional legal issues critical to their success, including assistance and counseling on entity selection and formation; regulatory compliance and licensing; trademark/copyright protection; lease review and negotiation; contract preparation/review/negotiation; tax-exempt applications; and other legal issues confronting small businesses, both for-profit and nonprofit. Students also will learn how a small law office operates, including procedures for client intake, file maintenance, project tracking, timekeeping, and scheduling. In addition to attending the weekly class, students will be expected to spend approximately 10-12 hours per week on their clinic work, with a minimum of 3 of those hours spent working in the clinic offices at the law school. The ECDC will represent primarily clients of limited financial means who cannot afford the services of the private bar and will not represent clients in litigation or in proceedings before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

SPECIAL NOTES: Interested students should look for email announcements regarding information sessions about the Clinic and how to apply.

Instructor: Morris

Description: 

This course surveys the government's role in environmental protection, including the scope and nature of governmental control. Topics covered include pollution control, toxic substances and hazardous waste, as well as conservation measures.

SPECIAL NOTE: Laptop and Electronic Device Policy: You may use your laptop only for classwork. However, I think that you would be better prepared for the examination and class participation if you do not use your laptop for note taking and instead use a paper notebook. You may not use your laptop, cell phone or any other electronic device during class to text, e-mail, chat, read, check the internet or play games during class. You may use your laptop during our review session(s) at the end of the semester.

Instructor: Godsey

Description:

The goal of this course is for students to know and be able to apply (1) the Federal Rules of Evidence governing relevance, unfair prejudice, character evidence, impeachment, hearsay, and opinion testimony; (2) the rules as they intersect with a few constitutional provisions, such as the Sixth Amendment confrontation right; and (3) some housekeeping rules, such as Rules 102-105, 201, 611, and the Best Evidence rule.

Instructor: Moore

Description:

For many students, mastering the rules of evidence is akin to learning a new language. This limited-enrollment course (25 students maximum) is designed for students for whom such mastery requires more frequent, intensive practice and individualized, rigorous feedback than is possible in a larger class with a more traditional lecture/Socratic dialogue approach. Formative assessments and skills practice will reinforce core evidence doctrines double-tested on the bar such as relevance, hearsay, impeachment, and opinion testimony. Individual and group exercises will occur daily during class (problem sets, quizzes, short drafting assignments, and oral arguments) and in weekly writing labs focused on longer drafting assignments such as client letters, motions, and exam essays. Peer review will complement regular feedback from the instructor. Priority registration for the course will be offered to students bound by Academic Rule 9 who have not previously taken Evidence. Remaining spots will be open to all 2L and 3L JD students.

Instructor: Hubbard

Description:

Primary focus is on the relationship between law and the family in the context of the creation, maintenance and restructuring of domestic relations. Special attention is given to the nature of marriage, separation, divorce, dissolution, support, alimony, and child custody.

Instructor: Solimine

Description:

This course addresses issues of federalism and separation of powers raised by statutes and doctrines which establish and limit federal court jurisdiction. Among the matters addressed are standing, legislative courts, congressional power over federal jurisdiction, the Eleventh Amendment, and the abstention doctrines. Also considered are the role state courts play in the formation and application of doctrines.

Instructor: Howe

Description:

This class will focus upon practical and procedural issues involving criminal post-conviction remedies at both the state and federal levels. The class will examine not only the constitutional aspects of collaterally attacking a conviction, but will also address the mechanics of litigating post-conviction appeals. While not excluding other types of cases, the class will concentrate on the death penalty. Criminal Procedure II is a recommended prerequisite, but not required.

Description:

This course is structured around the two dominant themes of the taxation of individuals under the Internal Revenue Code: what is income, and what is deductible; and when must the taxpayer recognize income, and when can the taxpayer deduct a particular expense. Also the course examines miscellaneous topics such as capital gains and losses, identifying the proper taxpayer, and others.

Description:

This course focuses on the interpretation of texts, both legal and literary. Students will perform close readings of novels, short stories, essays, and poems, as well as judicial opinions. Centering gender, we will read texts by writers of different eras, races, ethnicities, and classes. We also will examine the multifaceted relationship between culture and law.

Instructor: Lockwood

Description:

Editor Position: By permission of Instructor. Participating students engage in the selection and editing of articles for publication in the University of Cincinnati Human Rights Quarterly. The Registrar will enroll students selected to participate in the necessary class through the registration system.

Instructor: Lockwood

Description:

Participating students engage in the selection and editing of articles for publication in the University of Cincinnati Human Rights Quarterly. The Registrar will enroll students selected to participate in the necessary class through the registration system.

Instructor: Bai

Description:

Participating students engage in selection and preparation of articles for publication in the Review. Students also write notes and comments for publication in the Review. Students will be scheduled by the Registrar.

Instructor: Bai

Description:

Participating students engage in selection and preparation of articles for publication in the Review. Students also write notes and comments for publication in the Review. Students will be scheduled by the Registrar.

Instructor: Vazquez

Description:

This course is designed to provide an understanding of contemporary issues in U.S. immigration law and policy through an examination of the historical, political, and legal considerations that have shaped it. It will analyze various topics, such as proposed travel bans, unauthorized migration, detainers, state and local policies regarding immigration enforcement, sanctuary cities, federalism, removal priorities, immigration detention, constitutional protections for noncitizens, birthright citizenship, various categories of visas of admission, and comprehensive immigration reform. While this course will be grounded in the current issues surrounding how migrants are admitted to, excluded, and removed from this country, contemporary issues within immigration cannot be understood without discussing the historical events, political debates, and laws and policies that established U.S. immigration law. Most fundamentally, immigration law raises the questions of who we imagine ourselves to be as a country, who we really are, and how immigration law has been created to support these conclusions. Therefore, this class will also address the constitutional roots and reverberations of immigration law, its relationship to other areas of law, and its broad policy implications.

Description:

This course will explore the responsibilities of a lawyer serving as in-house legal counsel to a corporation. We will focus on the role of the in-house counsel as an indispensable partner to the organizational client, and the skills and capabilities necessary to achieve that goal. The course will be valuable for any student interested in working as an in-house lawyer, or with a firm or governmental agency that regularly engages with in-house legal departments.

Instructor: Silverstein

Description:

Through the Office of the Hamilton County Public Defender, students provide representation to indigent criminal defendants in misdemeanor cases. Each student is closely supervised by a licensed attorney and handles all aspects of the case, from the initial client interview and investigation to motions practice and trial advocacy. During the year-long program, students must commit 15 hours each week to the clinic, including participation in a weekly Thursday evening classroom component. This is a continuation of the Clinic from fall semester; accepted and enrolled students commit to both semesters of their third year. Limited to students who participated in the Clinic in the previous semester; 3L’s only; students must qualify for the Ohio Student Intern License to enroll in this clinic.

Instructor: Silverstein

Description:

Concurrent enrollment required in LITG 7051. Through the Office of the Hamilton County Public Defender, students provide representation to indigent criminal defendants in misdemeanor cases. Each student is closely supervised by a licensed attorney and handles all aspects of the case, from the initial client interview and investigation to motions practice and trial advocacy. During the year-long program, students must commit 15 hours each week to the clinic, including participation in a weekly Thursday evening classroom component. This is a continuation of the Clinic from fall semester; accepted and enrolled students commit to both semesters of their third year. SPECIAL NOTES: Limited to students who participated in the Clinic in previous fall semester; 3L’s only; students must qualify for the Ohio Student Intern License to enroll in this clinic.

Description:

Under the direct supervision of a member of the faculty, upper-level students engage in original research and prepare for credit a substantial written work product. The research project is selected jointly by the student and faculty member. Customarily, the final product will be a research paper, and, in that case, the paper must be 10-15 pages long for one credit, 20-30 pages long for two credits, and 35-50 pages long for three credits.

SPECIAL NOTE: Students must register for the course and present a completed contract by the last day of the drop/add period. Contracts must be turned in on time or students will be dropped from the class. You are limited to five total credits of Individual writing per academic year.

Description:

Under the direct supervision of a member of the faculty, upper-level students engage in original research and prepare for credit a substantial written work product. The research project is selected jointly by the student and faculty member. Customarily, the final product will be a research paper, and, in that case, the paper must be 10-15 pages long for one credit, 20-30 pages long for two credits, and 35-50 pages long for three credits.

SPECIAL NOTE: Students must register for the course and present a completed contract by the last day of the drop/add period. Contracts must be turned in on time or students will be dropped from the class. You are limited to five total credits of Individual writing per academic year.

Description:

Under the direct supervision of a member of the faculty, upper-level students engage in original research and prepare for credit a substantial written work product. The research project is selected jointly by the student and faculty member. Customarily, the final product will be a research paper, and, in that case, the paper must be 10-15 pages long for one credit, 20-30 pages long for two credits, and 35-50 pages long for three credits.

SPECIAL NOTE: Students must register for the course and present a completed contract by the last day of the drop/add period. Contracts must be turned in on time or students will be dropped from the class. You are limited to five total credits of Individual writing per academic year.

Instructors: Bergeron, Caster, Godsey, Howe

Description:

The Ohio Innocence Project (OIP), a part of the Rosenthal Institute for Justice, harnesses the energy and intellect of students to identify inmates in Ohio prisons who are innocent of the crimes they were convicted of committing. Innocence is often determined by DNA testing, but can include other types of new evidence such as new witnesses, new expert testimony, or evidence of police misconduct. Once an inmate's innocence has been established through investigation, the OIP sends the case back to court and litigates in the hope of obtaining the inmate's freedom. SPECIAL NOTES: Enrollment by permission of instructor; full year commitment required; must complete year if participated in the fall of 2018.

Instructors: Bergeron, Caster, Godsey, Howe

Description:

In this course, students examine the various types of evidence that might lead to the wrongful conviction of innocent persons. They will also consider the roles police, prosecutors, and defense lawyers play in the criminal justice system, with an emphasis on discovering how errors can lead to the conviction of the innocent. SPECIAL NOTES: Field Study in the spring semester is required. The Registrar will enroll students selected to participate in the necessary class through the registration system.

Instructor: Armstrong

Description:

Intellectual Property & Computer Law Journal Editor-in-Chief. By permission of supervising faculty/instructor. The Intellectual Property and Computer Law Journal is dedicated to furthering knowledge associated with the research and practice of intellectual property law, computer law, and related fields concerning domestic and international media and telecommunications policy. The Journal will be published online. The Registrar will enroll students selected to participate in the necessary class through the registration system.

Instructor: Armstrong

Description:

The Intellectual Property and Computer Law Journal is dedicated to furthering knowledge associated with the research and practice of intellectual property law, computer law, and related fields concerning domestic and international media and telecommunications policy. The Journal will be published online. The Registrar will enroll students selected to participate in the necessary class through the registration system.

Instructor: Armstrong

Description:

The Intellectual Property and Computer Law Journal is dedicated to furthering knowledge associated with the research and practice of intellectual property law, computer law, and related fields concerning domestic and international media and telecommunications policy. The Journal will be published online. The Registrar will enroll students selected to participate in the necessary class through the registration system.

Instructor: Pinney

Description:

The course is designed to introduce the student to international commercial arbitration. The course will focus on preparing the student both for advising companies on negotiating effective dispute resolution provisions in cross-border commercial contracts and representing clients having a dispute before an international commercial arbitration tribunal. The course will begin by emphasizing the importance of a well-crafted dispute resolution provision in cross-border agreements and the inadequacies of leaving dispute resolution to national courts. The course will then address the differences in customs and legal traditions in Europe, Asia and Latin America and the influence of such differences on the manner in which disputes are resolved and arbitrations are conducted. The student will be introduced to the principal international arbitral institutions administrating international arbitrations and their procedural rules, and also to the UNCITRAL Arbitration Rules (for ad hoc non-administered arbitrations) and investor/state arbitrations under bilateral investment treaties. In addition, there will be a brief introduction to the Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods. The remainder of the course will demonstrate, using a hypothetical international business dispute, the procedures step-by-step typically used in an international commercial arbitration, including: commencement and issuance of the statements of claims and defense, the selection of arbitrators, the disclosure process, the pleadings and submissions of pre-hearing briefs and memorials, the presentation of written and oral evidence at the hearing, the issuance of the award, the role of courts in enforcing arbitral agreements and ultimately enforcement or vacatur of the award under the New York Convention and a variety of specific arbitration laws, including those in the United States, England, France, Hong Kong and China. Plans are being made to field a University of Cincinnati College of Law team to compete in the Willem C. Vis International Commercial Arbitration Moot in Hong Kong in March 2022. If funding is secured for fielding a team for the 2021-22 Moot, at least two “team” members will be chosen from students in the class. Four members of the UC Law Team would travel to Hong Kong in March 2022 and compete against about 130 law schools from around the world on the 2022 Moot Problem which is issued in early October 2021. The mid-term paper based on the 2021 Vis Moot Problem will be used as one of the vehicles from which team members will be selected.

Instructor: Behlen

Description:

This course will examine the fundamentals of Criminal Law and International Law. It will consider the development of international criminal tribunals from the Nuremberg Tribunal to the International Criminal Court. The course will explore comparative criminal procedure and sentencing, principles of jurisdiction, the extraterritorial application of U.S. criminal statutes, and immunities. It will cover U.S. Constitutional rights in a transnational context, obtaining evidence abroad, and extradition. Next, the course will explore transnational crime: organized crime, trafficking, money laundering, corruption, and terrorism. Finally, the course will examine the International Criminal Court; modes of participation; defenses; international crimes: crimes against humanity, genocide, war crimes, the crime of aggression, torture, sexual violence; and alternatives to prosecution, such as truth and reconciliation commissions.

Instructor: Mank

Description:

This course covers the nature and causes of global and international environmental problems, international law and institutions for environmental protection, and relationships between developed and developing countries. It examines to what extent American courts can address international environmental problems such as global warming. The course fulfills the seminar requirement. Students are welcome to take the course even if they have not taken Environmental Law I.

Instructor: Szegedy-Maszak

Description:

Discusses current trends in international trade policies related to the multilateral trading system developed through the World Trade Organization, Trade Agreements such as USMCA and CPTPP, as well as Investment Protection Treaties. How market economies can develop equilibrated trade relations with state managed economic systems is the central concern of the course. It is supposed that the crisis of the multilateral trading system can be one of the potential causes of the on-going Trade Tech War. During our course we analyze the geopolitical implications of the US-China economic rivalry and where the European Union stands in these battles. Innovation ecosystems, IP and Greentech are also studied in the context of COVID-19 recovery packages in US and EU, as well as the new five-year plan in China. Being critical and constructive are the main attitudes of the course to raise and discuss the most urgent questions of the international trading system and how trade regulation can contribute to manage increasing global conflicts. Dr. Ildikó Szegedy-Maszák is a member of the faculty of law at Javeriana Pontifical University in Bogotá, Colombia. An expert in international trade, Dr. Szegedy-Maszak is well published on related subjects. Dr. Szegedy-Maszák is a regular visiting professor at Comillas Pontifical University in Madrid, Spain and Corvinus University of Budapest in Hungary where she teaches on international economic law and public policies with special interest in international trade.

Instructor: Acheson

Description:

This broadest and most basic course gives roughly equal time to the three primary federal doctrines in the area, copyright, trademark, and patent, and gives students a brief introduction to related state law doctrines such as rights of publicity and trade secrets. This course provides students with the basics of each doctrine as well as an understanding of the ways in which they interact with each other.

Instructor: Hunt

Description:

This course introduces the student to the issues arising from the interaction of mentally ill or incapacitated individuals with the American civil and criminal justice system. It also considers the practice and structure of the mental health profession. SPECIAL NOTES: Taking this course satisfies only one of the graduation requirements (seminar or writing). If you take this course and have not yet satisfied the seminar requirement, you will be deemed to have met the seminar requirement. However, if you take this course and you have already met the seminar requirement, you will be deemed to have met the writing requirement. Two, separate courses are required to satisfy both the seminar and writing requirements. No one course satisfies them both.

Instructor: Whiteman

Description:

This course will explore how law is an important part of all aspects of our society, including our economy, our democracy, and our personal lives. Using current topics in law, such as drones, online privacy issues, and issues of policing, students will explore the broad impact of the law and legal actors on our society. Fundamental concepts will be discussed that include property rights as a bundle of rights and law giving rise to settled expectations so that businesses are willing to make investments in the economy. The course will also explore the role of attorneys in society including how they are trained and licensed in the United States. Types of legal practices will be discussed such as business, criminal, intellectual property, litigation, employment, and other common types of practice areas. Important topics of legal ethics will be discussed. Students will have the opportunity to meet lawyers and law students, along with opportunities to visit places where law is important, which may include courtrooms, prisons, law firms, and businesses.

Instructor: Mangan

Description:

This class provides a comprehensive introduction to drafting legal documents in the transactional context, with a heavy emphasis on contracts and internal corporate documents. Students will learn the basic concepts that guide contract drafting and how mastery of these concepts aid in managing risk in legal transactions. Students will complete a number of short drafting exercises and four graded drafting assignments.

Instructor: Szydlowski

Description:

The classroom component of the Judicial Extern Program covers writing for judges and professional conduct for judges and judicial clerks. The work performed in the judicial extern field placement is similar to that performed by a law clerk to a judge. It usually involves preparing memoranda on cases, reviewing case files, drafting opinions and orders, and attending court and conferences. The precise tasks performed, however, depend upon the type of court and the style of the judge. SPECIAL NOTES: Concurrent enrollment in Judicial Externship class and field placement required. Complete the Judicial Externship Survey in the Symplicity “Job Postings” section. Upload your completed survey along with your current resume and transcript to be matched with a judicial extern placement. Students may not enroll concurrently in Extern programs.

Instructor: Szydlowski

Description:

The classroom component of the Judicial Extern Program covers writing for judges and professional conduct for judges and judicial clerks. The work performed in the judicial extern field placement is similar to that performed by a law clerk to a judge. It usually involves preparing memoranda on cases, reviewing case files, drafting opinions and orders, and attending court and conferences. The precise tasks performed, however, depend upon the type of court and the style of the judge. SPECIAL NOTES: Concurrent enrollment in Judicial Externship class and field placement required. Complete the Judicial Externship Survey in the Symplicity “Job Postings” section. Upload your completed survey along with your current resume and transcript to be matched with a judicial extern placement. Students may not enroll concurrently in Extern programs.

Instructor: Lenski

Description:

This seminar will focus on the inequities in the child welfare and juvenile justice systems by examining the structures of these systems along with a real world application.

Instructor: Malloy

Description:

The blog has student, professor and practitioner contributors. Knowledge of Bluebook and Texas Law Review Manual for Style and Usage, and ability to coordinate. The job responsibilities of the Blog Editor would include: • Actively solicit and select practitioners for blog posts • Ensure Contributing Members, Guest or Student Editors, and Student Contributors all meet posting requirements ensuring conformance with the Texas Law Review Manual for Style and Usage and that all footnote content conform with the Bluebook • Coordinating promotion and utilization of the blog including monitoring any comments/feedback. In recognition of the responsibilities of the Blog Editor, this position will receive 2 non-classroom credit hours; it would not meet the writing or seminar requirement. This position would only be open to 3L students. The UC Law Review Blog is of great importance to the future of the Law Review. With a dedicated position overseeing the blog, the maintenance and care of the blog can be guaranteed. By Permission Only

Instructor: Malloy

Description:

Participating students engage in the selection and editing of articles for publication in the University of Cincinnati Law Review. Some students also write notes and comments for publication in the Review or blog. Students must participate in a competition and be selected to participate. The Registrar will enroll students selected to participate in the necessary class through the registration system.

Instructor: Malloy

Description:

Participating students engage in the selection and editing of articles for publication in the University of Cincinnati Law Review. Some students also write notes and comments for publication in the Review or blog. Students must participate in a competition and be selected to participate. The Registrar will enroll students selected to participate in the necessary class through the registration system.

Instructor: Malloy

Description:

By permission only. Participating students engage in the selection and editing of articles for publication in the University of Cincinnati Law Review. Some students also write notes and comments for publication in the Review or blog. Students must participate in a competition and be selected to participate. The Registrar will enroll students selected to participate in the necessary class through the registration system.

Instructor: Malloy

Description:

Participating students engage in the selection and editing of articles for publication in the University of Cincinnati Law Review. Some students also write notes and comments for publication in the Review or blog. Students must participate in a competition and be selected to participate. The Registrar will enroll students selected to participate in the necessary class through the registration system.

Instructor: Tomain

Description:

Traditionally, lawyers have played central roles in the organization of society and the administration of justice. They also further the interests of their clients through persuasive argumentation. Using a number of "great books," this course will examine forms of argument and forms of legal authority.

Instructor: Royalty

Description:

In this course students consider the lawyer-client relationship in the context of realistic scenarios, evaluating the complete choices an ethical lawyer must make to establish an effective lawyer-client relationship. Following an examination of the ABA Model Rules and the Ohio Rules of Professional Conduct, students consider the ethical components of the lawyer-client relationship, with an emphasis on competency, confidentiality, and conflicts of interest. The course also includes substantial instruction in the history, goals, structure, values, and responsibilities of the legal profession and its members.

Instructor: Chanvisanuruk

Description:

In this course, students consider the lawyer-client relationship in the context of realistic scenarios, evaluating the complex choices an ethical lawyer must make to establish an effective lawyer-client relationship. Following an examination of the ABA Model Rules, students consider the ethical components of the lawyer-client relationship, with an emphasis on competency, confidentiality, and conflicts of interest. The course also includes multiple skills application exercises to introduce students to Performance Tests and Professional Responsibility Exams required by state bar examiners.

Instructor: Szydlowski

Description:

The classroom component of the Legal Extern I Program emphasizes practical lawyering competencies and ethical issues encountered in the practice of law. In their field placements, legal externs work under the supervision of attorneys in local, state, and federal agencies, non-profit organizations, and in businesses and law firms in the private sector. SPECIAL NOTES: Concurrent enrollment in Legal Externship I class and field placement required. Complete the Legal Externship Survey in the Symplicity “Job Postings” section. Upload your completed survey along with your current resume and transcript. Spots are limited and students will be chosen based on preferences and availability. Students may not enroll concurrently in Extern programs.

Instructor: Szydlowski

Description:

The classroom component of the Legal Extern I Program emphasizes practical lawyering competencies and ethical issues encountered in the practice of law. In their field placements, legal externs work under the supervision of attorneys in local, state, and federal agencies, non-profit organizations, and in businesses and law firms in the private sector. SPECIAL NOTES: Concurrent enrollment in Legal Externship I class and field placement required. Complete the Legal Externship Survey in the Symplicity “Job Postings” section. Upload your completed survey along with your current resume and transcript. Spots are limited and students will be chosen based on preferences and availability. Students may not enroll concurrently in Extern programs.

Instructor: Szydlowski

Description:

The classroom component of the Legal Extern I Program emphasizes practical lawyering competencies and ethical issues encountered in the practice of law. In their field placements, legal externs work under the supervision of attorneys in local, state, and federal agencies, non-profit organizations, and in businesses and law firms in the private sector. SPECIAL NOTES: Concurrent enrollment in Legal Externship I class and field placement required. Complete the Legal Externship Survey in the Symplicity “Job Postings” section. Upload your completed survey along with your current resume and transcript. Spots are limited and students will be chosen based on preferences and availability. Students may not enroll concurrently in Extern programs.

Instructor: Szydlowski

Description:

The classroom component of the Legal Extern II Program expands upon the practical lawyering competencies addressed in Legal Externship I. In their field placements, legal externs work under the supervision of attorneys in local, state, and federal agencies, non-profit organizations, and in businesses and law firms in the private sector. SPECIAL NOTES: Concurrent enrollment in Legal Externship II class and field placement required. Complete the Legal Externship Survey in the Symplicity “Job Postings” section. Upload your completed survey along with your current resume and transcript. Spots are limited and students will be chosen based on preferences and availability. Students may not enroll concurrently in Extern programs. Prerequisite: Legal Externship I.

Description:

This course is designed to meet the needs of LL.M students who received their legal education in a foreign country. This course will introduce students to basic research skills, persuasion strategies, and fundamentals of written communication needed in both law school and professional practice as a lawyer. Students will learn how to respond to a legal problem by identifying the legal issue, researching the law, interpreting and applying legal materials, and then communicating their own legal analysis and conclusions in writing. Emphasis is given to basic writing skills including, among others, legal analysis, style, and citations. The course will prepare students to successfully prepare basic legal documents such as legal memoranda and briefs. All LL.M. students must complete this three-credit course. J.D. students are not permitted to enroll in this course.

Instructor: Bryant

Description:

This course explores the enactment of statutes by federal and state legislators and the interpretation given by the courts and administrative agencies to such legislative enactments. The course will focus on various procedural, constitutional, and jurisprudential issues relating to the legislative and electoral processes embodied in our constitutional order, and to the methods of statutory interpretation employed by our courts and administrative agencies. Chief among the many aims of the course is to introduce students to the legal problems posed by legislative government, in the hopes that as practicing lawyers they will be more effective participants in the legislative process and the subsequent implementation and interpretation of statutes. Please Note: Substantive and thoughtful class discussion is an essential component of this course. Accordingly, the use of laptops and other computer devices will not be permitted in class.

Instructor: Stephani

Description:

In the first of this 2-semester course, we will examine the constitutional dimensions of the differential treatment of persons with serious mental disorders in the criminal justice system and in civil commitment settings. A recurring theme will be a scrutiny of the justifications offered for the various state-imposed detention schemes for persons with serious mental disorders. SPECIAL NOTE: Required for Weaver Institute Fellows; this class also includes Psychiatric Fellows in the UC Forensic Psychiatry Fellowship and graduate students from selected mental health disciplines.

Instructor: Oliver

Description:

This is the intramural competition for the Moot Court Honor Board open to all 2L students. Students wishing to participate in the competition should enroll in this class. Participating students represent the College of Law in various intercollegiate moot court competitions. Students will be scheduled by the Registrar.

Instructor: Oliver

Description:

Prerequisites: Moot Court Honor Board. Participating students represent the College of Law in various intercollegiate moot court competitions. Students will be scheduled by the Registrar.

Instructor: Oliver

Description:

Prerequisite for Moot Court Executive Editor and other positions. Participating students represent the College of Law in various intercollegiate moot court competitions. Students will be scheduled by the Registrar.

Instructor: Oliver

Description:

Prerequisite for Moot Court Executive Editor and other positions. Participating students represent the College of Law in various intercollegiate moot court competitions. Students will be scheduled by the Registrar.

Instructor: Oliver

Description:

Prerequisites: Moot Court Honor Board. Participating students represent the College of Law in various intercollegiate moot court competitions. Students will be scheduled by the Registrar.

Instructor: Aaron

Description:

In this course students learn the "science and art" of negotiation. Students are introduced to significant literature and theory in negotiation and have the opportunity to practice negotiating through a sequenced series of negotiations simulations.

Instructor: Acheson

Description:

This course examines the federal statutory system of protection for useful, novel, and non-obvious inventions and those developments that enrich the technological arts. A technical/science background is not required to take this course. SPECIAL NOTE: This course is a prerequisite for Patent Office Practice and Procedure.

Instructor: Liles

Description:

This course will focus on the unique procedural, substantive and strategic aspects of patent litigation and enforcement. The course will benefit students seeking to acquire broad-based litigation skills as well as those with specific interest in patent law. For students specifically interested in patent law, the course is designed to benefit not only those with litigation interests, but also those interested in improving the quality of patents they may draft and prosecute by learning how issued patents are analyzed in courts and attacked in litigation. Specific topics include claim interpretation, the interrelationship between written descriptions and claims, proof of infringement, special issues in attorney/client privilege and waiver, discovery of confidential information, validity issues, patent remedies and defenses. Students will have the opportunity to prepare written pleadings and briefs and to orally argue claim interpretations and infringement/non-infringement positions in simulated hearings and/or motions. Performance on these projects will form the basis for student assessment.

Description:

In this course, students will work at the University of Cincinnati College of Law’s Patent and Trademark Clinic (PTC), obtaining “hands on” experience representing local business owners, aspiring entrepreneurs, and inventors in identifying, protecting, and commercializing their intellectual property, focusing on work to be performed in the patent and trademark areas, as well as transactional documents relating to intellectual property. Services for individual clients may include completion of patent applications (provisional and non-provisional); completion of federal trademark applications; analysis and opinions on patent and trademark registrability; analysis and opinions on patent, trademark, and/or copyright infringement; assistance on responding to office actions from the USPTO; preparation, review, and/or negotiation of IP licenses and other related agreements; and general IP advice. The PTC will not represent its clients in litigation/dispute resolution or on foreign applications. The PTC will be structured to simulate practice in a law firm, and will provide insight and experiences in PTC students also will learn how a small law office operates, including procedures for client intake, conflict checks, file maintenance, project tracking, timekeeping, scheduling, coordination, and client communications. Students will perform all work at the PTC under the close supervision of its directors and volunteer-lawyers with relevant expertise. Students will be expected to average 8-12 hours per week working on clinic matters. The PTC will share the offices of the Entrepreneurship and Community Development Clinic. The PTC will represent onlyprioritize representation of clients of limited financial means and/or local entrepreneurs, means who cannot afford the services of the private bar and will not represent clients in litigation related matters..

Instructor: Lenhart

Description:

This course will focus solely on the litigation skills that an attorney must master in order to steer a civil case from the beginning of a dispute to the point immediately preceding a trial. Topics may include: development of the legal theory/theories in a case (causes of action and defenses); pleadings, including state and federal filing rules, proper parties, service considerations, electronic filing, and waiver of service of summons; development of discovery strategies; discovery, including interrogatories, requests for production of documents, requests for admissions, and motions to compel; depositions, taking and defending; experts, including retainer issues, drafting expert reports, and taking/defending expert depositions; pre-trial motion practice; trial-witness preparation; jury instructions and pre-trial statements; and court-ordered mediation and settlement.

Instructor: Morris

Description:

This course is an introduction to public international law. In the first part of the course, we will cover the origins, sources, and subjects of international law; the institutions that make and interpret it; and the actors that shape the international legal order. We will also discuss the application of international law in U.S. courts. In the second part of the course, we will focus on the ways in which the international legal system addresses issues of broad global concern, such as war, economic integration, environmental protection, and public health. We will critically reflect on this with reference to specific topics, including the regulation of the use of force, international humanitarian law, international environmental law, international trade law, the law of the sea, and international human rights law. Throughout the course, we will draw on current events and contemporary debates in global politics to highlight the possibilities and the challenges of the international legal system.

Instructor: Morgan

Description:

This class will focus on the practical application of real property law by walking through standard residential real estate transactions, explaining how to draft documents to avoid disputes, and the litigation options available when conflicts arise. Areas covered will include: Attorney’s and broker’s roles in the transaction; the contract of sale; due diligence during the transaction; title assurance; and financing including mortgage foreclosures and distressed sales.

Instructor: Kalsem

Description:

This course focuses on laws governing secured transactions, specifically as set forth in Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code. The topics addressed include the creation and perfection of security interests in personal property, priorities, and remedies upon default in these secured transactions, and the interactions of the laws governing secured transactions with the Bankruptcy Code.

Instructor: McMahon

Description:

Securities Regulation presents an overview of federal securities laws with emphasis on the registration requirements of the Securities Act of 1933 and the major exemptions from these requirements, including exemptions commonly used by small and early-stage businesses. The course also covers the reporting and disclosure requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and the anti-fraud provisions of the Securities Act and the Exchange Act.

Instructors: Colvin, Paulson

Description:

Students from both the UC College of Law and the Salmon P. Chase College of Law will be participating. In this clinic, students will work on cases for indigent clients whose cases are on appeal to the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, a federal appellate court located in Cincinnati. Under the supervision of experienced attorneys, students will analyze trial records, identify arguments to be used in the appeals process, and write motions and briefs for their clients. This is an excellent opportunity for students to learn about federal courts, criminal law, appellate procedure, and improve writing skills. Students will also have the chance to learn from experienced lawyers, meet members of the federal bar, and meet federal judges. Students will be expected to attend oral arguments at the Sixth Circuit as well as present their own oral arguments in class. Some students have been able to argue before the Sixth Circuit, though such opportunities vary with timing and interest.

Instructors: Colvin, Paulson

Description:

Concurrent enrollment in LITG 7043 is required.

Instructor: Kemen

Description:

The expanding use of technology is affecting the practice of law in all fields and venues. This class will focus on real-world applications of technology and the importance of collaboration to provide the highest level of client service. The emphasis of the class will be on group work in small firms. After completing the class students should have a better understanding of how to organize and operate a law practice, use cloud computing and other technology platforms, create a firm online presence, create a firm technology policy and understand the ethical implications of technology use.

Instructor: Moore

Description:

This one-credit course examines leading issues, cases, and legislation related to capital punishment in the United States. Topics include movements for and against abolition of the death penalty; categorical exclusions from eligibility for execution; jury selection, sentencing, and post-conviction processes; methods of execution; and the roles of race, gender, and socioeconomic status in the administration of the death penalty.

Instructor: Aaron

Description:

To be a trial lawyer is to be a story teller, stage director, and character in drama where the audience determines the resolution. This course will review and provide practice in each aspect of trial, from working with facts and developing strategy and then, to structure and techniques for effective opening statements, direct and cross examination, and closing argument. We will focus on those elements that are also applicable to professional presentations in other contexts: communicating to render complexity accessible, build your own and witness credibility and audience trust, and persuade the audience using emotion as well as reason.

Instructor: Aaron

Description:

Students prepare for and participate in Trial Practice Competition Team events.

Instructor: Wagner

Description:

This course is developed specifically to meet the needs of foreign-trained LL.M. students. The course will provide an overview of the critical features of the U.S. legal tradition, the functional components and participants in our legal system, and key legal concepts. The course will briefly introduce students to the various areas of U.S. legal practice and provide a more in-depth discussion of foundational concepts such as the several sources of U.S. law, the Common Law tradition and federalism. Students will be expected to complete assigned readings in advance of each class. Student achievement will be assessed based on attendance, class participation, writing assignments, and a final exam. J.D. students are not permitted to enroll in this course.

Instructor: Chang

Description:

This course covers the variety of ways in which people can arrange for the passage of their property at their death. Students study common law and statutory methods of dealing with property left by a decedent who did or did not leave a will; the procedures and problems of creating, construing, contesting, or revoking wills; the concerns for providing for surviving spouses and other family members; fiduciary duties in the administration of estates and some of the methods for avoiding the probate of estates.